Shopping – Impulsive OR Intentional!

The designs, the colours, the textures, ah! Human psychology compels us to buy items due to their appealing nature. Though many people are passionate shoppers, claiming that they are ‘obsessed’ is quite another ball game.
Shopping is an everyday activity until it becomes addictive. A portmanteau derived from shop + alcoholic, ‘shopaholics,’ are two kinds. The people concerned with festooning a fashionable aura around themselves while keeping (or trying to keep) a check on their finances is of a positive type.

What on earth could be the other then? You guessed it!

A other type looks for excuses to splurge on unnecessary products they probably never touch. They ultimately end up feeling guilty but cannot control themselves easily.

HIT OF DOPAMINE – CAN’T BE WORN AGAIN

Some triggers provoke the buyer into purchasing unnecessary products. When items – however unnecessary – are affordable, a rush of anxiety kicks in, thus influencing the buyer to make that purchase quickly. Sales and flea markets prey on this vulnerability. Buyers are urged to make impulsive decisions, compounded when one is a shopaholic. Another such trigger is clutter: it is easy for shopaholics to go out and buy clothes compared to spending hours decluttering and organising what they already have. Impulsive shopping is not safe: it increases troubles like monetary concerns and mental stress.

OH NO – I”M FINE WITH FOMO 

On the other hand, intentional shopping is being able to control your expenditure by spending within your means. Cut your coat according to your cloth: this proverb is true indeed. Even if we are clumsy in a few instances in our lives, we go on working in specific ways – with routines, schedules and other structures – organizing our way through it all. It serves a profound purpose: to be under self-supervision and resist addictive activities (like excessive shopping). There is no negativity in intentional shopping. These shoppers find healthy ways to properly dispose of clothes (after their intense use). It is widely considered that a simple life devoid of clutter and excess is a genuinely wonderful life.

Intentional versus Impulsive: there is a fine line between these terms and, what’s more, a tough one to balance. You may not even realize you are addicted before you are overwhelmed with baggage (both physical and mental!) to get rid of. On which side of this precarious line do you fall?


Author:
Humpy Adepu
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Atash Coyaji
2nd Year, B. Des. Textile & Product Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication

Luxury Brands Shrugging the Pandemic

After the pandemic, there has been a significant shift in consumer behaviour owing to the rise of work-from-home culture resulting in an increase in internet shopping. In terms of the internet and the online world, luxury companies are not early adopters. Read on to see why!

Luxury companies’ digital sprint
Luxury brands are wary of the internet because they want to keep their items mysterious and hard to acquire. The brands seek to preserve their uniqueness and character by maintaining secrecy. From the way fashion shows are presented to how items are sold, the luxury fashion business is evolving at a fast rate. Brands are transitioning from physical modes to online in a more planned way than ever before.

Fashion show concept
There has been talk about whether physical fashion shows can still take place. The ever Bold-and-Beautiful Gucci has already opted not to follow the timetable of fashion shows! Nonetheless, the occasion has caused firms to consider new innovative ways to debut a fashion show. This year has seen a slew of memorable digital-only fashion presentations including Raf Simon and Miuccia Prada’s debut fashion show for Spring 2021.

Prada Spring RTW 2021


The main issue encountered during the internet fashion show was that it was extremely difficult to produce the same level of enthusiasm as the physical ones, but the big potential was to provide customers with the same level of access that top reviewers typically had. Isn’t that marvelous?
Luxury brands have been producing a stream of narrative videos this year with the video material being emotive and mirroring current events like Alexander McQueen’s ‘first light’ film for its Spring 2021 campaign. The video creates a more meaningful and deep connection than word and image.

Alexander McQueen’s ‘First Light’ Collection

E-commerce
There was a huge increase in product sales through the online medium in 2020, and predictions say it will remain the same in 2021. This emphasized that there is a digital shift within luxury brands. The online fashion e-commerce platforms that were used by the brands are Farfetch, Mytheresa, Yoox Net-a-porter, Zalando Matches Fashion and Moda Operandi.
You will be intrigued to know that not only e-commerce but also the emerge of different selling modes has been affected! For instance, livestreaming has become popular in the world. Instagram is now bolstering the social commerce option.
Livestreaming is seen as a viable alternative for reaching customers in lower-tier cities because they do not have access to some physical stores. However, some people believe it critical for elite companies to maintain consistency in content quality. Some procedures, such as fitting reservations or ordering online and picking up in a store, have been around for a long time and have become considerably popular.

Gucci live


Gucci has released a new app named “Gucci Live” available in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The app insists on bringing the brand closer to its clients because the brand believes that only online purchasing lacks intimacy. Customers can speak with a genuine sales professional in the shop to ensure that the service quality is maintained. It is interactive, and users can use augmented reality to try on different garments and accessories. They can even create their own Gucci footwear in the app. People think it is loads of fun, and it helps to tackle the problem of closed physical businesses through new and creative solutions. Nonetheless, it is critical for brands to build the infrastructure necessary for long-term objectives. This seems to be true not only for Gucci but for all luxury labels. Customers must be enticed to interact online by fashion players finding innovative ways to thrill them.
To paraphrase, brands must adapt their tactics by rapidly determining which trends will persist after the ongoing crisis has passed. People are aiming for minimal change or a heavy reliance on specific markets/platforms. As a result, premium businesses must prioritise digital transformation. Brands must set clear, long-term objectives in 2021 while exhibiting enough flexibility, speed and agility to manage an uncertain short-term future.
Despite the fact that this notion has been debated for some time, the pandemic has accelerated the need for change. Physical stores are no longer physical stores, and online businesses are no longer simply online businesses.


Author:
Siddharth Bhardwaj
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication

Editors:
Atash Coyaji
2nd Year, B. Des. Textile Product Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Indrani Roy
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Rent The Runway

The online ‘Rental Fashion’ market in India has been on its peak with mushrooming startups and classic brands attracting the posh. The new age fashionistas believe in renting, rather than buying expensive designer wear. Turning up at a high profile luxury event in clothes that are rented and not owned isn’t a taboo anymore rather a new normal for the elites. A hectic social life coupled with the onslaught of social media has made repeating ones clothing or accessory almost unforgivable and even social harakiri. Circumstantially it makes little sense to invest thousands of rupees on clothes that will be worn once and be relegated to a corner in the closet.

A decade ago, renting high-end luxury or designer wear was more or less unheard of. Women who didn’t want to purchase an expensive dress for a one-time event were left to borrow it from a friend. Designer gown and accessory rentals were the exclusive territory of celebrities and their stylists.

While the international market is huge for wardrobe rental services, with successful ventures like rent the Runway, Lending Luxury, Girl Meets Dress, etc, for India this trend is still taking its baby steps. Shilpa Bhatia, an erstwhile Hindi film stylist, was among the first few to tap into the potential of luxury rental as early as in 2005 when she launched ‘The Clothing Rental’ in Mumbai. The Clothing Rental thrives today with two stores in Mumbai apart from an online presence. Offering similar deals are a number of online fashion rentals, including flyrobe.com, swishlist.in, stylebank.in, liberent.com and stage3.co.

Renting outfits has become common for those once-in-a-lifetime events (wedding, mehendi, sangeet, bridal showers, and bachelorette parties) that require a level of luxury that’s not necessarily worth the long-term investment. For instance, Flyrobe which claims to have partnered with designer labels like Outhouse, Masaba Gupta, Ritu Kumar, and Shehla Khan supplies western wear on-demand with a three-hour delivery timeline and the ethnic wear on advance booking. 

The concept of luxury rental is simple: Customers can choose from designer garments, handbags, sunglasses, jewellery and other accessories they like, rent it for a couple of days at a fraction of the retail price and then return it; so easy!. The courier is then picked up from your doorstep back to where it belongs. Some companies even allow the person to own it by paying the retail price for the item.

In today’s time, when everything is for everyone, the allure of ‘no ownership’ moves beyond housing and cars bringing High-End Fashion to its dawn as one of the biggest rental industries . It assures satisfaction to the customer’s desire for a luxury product without endangering their kidneys. The new generation raves multiple experiences and desires to be fashionable and trendy, without the pressure of a permanent commitment.


Author: Vasanti Choudhary 2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Indrani Roy
1st Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

“Whoever said Money can’t buy happiness simply didn’t know where to go shopping” – A Shopaholic’s Confession

My name is Prarthana and I have a problem. Actually I have 268 problems and if you count the three pairs of shoes at my aunt’s house and all the clothes my friends probably have, I would break 300.

I like clothes. I like shoes. I love the excitement of buying something new and the anticipation of wearing it. I like how my newly bought things smell like pure bliss. I love how beautiful things look when they are presented on the display and I love the feeling after knowing that I can afford that and later add it to my nearly overflowing closet.

There are certain instances where I do know when and where to spend my money but that never means that I don’t have the tiny tingle or urge inside of me to go and buy the thing I’ve been eyeing secretly. But, I tell myself what Rebecca Bloomwood kept telling herself – “Do I really need this ?” And I hope to convince myself to not buy whatsoever the item is, which apparently was something Rebecca wasn’t very good at ( seriously! If you don’t know Rebecca Bloomwood please do yourself a favour and go watch ‘Confessions of a Shopaholic’ ).

So what is it that makes me and a million others want to buy things off the rack even though most of the time we may not even need them ? 

“Luxury” traditionally is linked to excess and ostentatiousness. But forget the terms of the past, we now live in a society that appeals to the senses. Luxury nowadays is“being” instead of “having”. Materialistic objects lose their senses if they are coupled only with the desire of having.

Correct marketing is very essential in luxury fashion, which must attract a customer not just for a top quality and wonder of the thing , but also to an environment that a particular brand conveys.

Making the consumer feel attracted to the brand environment as well as desiring to be part of a certain “club”is the magic ingredient.

Champagnes, biscuits and other goodies, good music, a pleasing smell, soft fabrics and well-dressed staff are very strong tools to attract new customers and to retain the loyal ones.

Hence, our “inside voices” keep telling us to go there over and over again ‘cause they said, “mam this dress fits you as if it were made for you and it enhances your aura and it doesn’t just make you look like a queen but also, feel like one.” And from that part to the part where you swipe your card all you can think about is ‘I look like a Queen’, now tell me who wouldn’t like to look like one?


Authors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, Fashion Design

Why is Luxury Fashion so expensive?

Luxury used to be a synonym for quality. Most of the fashion brands built their brands on the best materials and the most skilled craftspeople, then charged customers a premium for both. Designer clothes of luxury brands are expensive because when the customer buys any designer clothing he not only pays for the item that he purchases but also for the time and energy that the designer and the craftsmen have put into it’s creation. Generally luxury designers spend months over the design of one dress to make it a perfect piece for their customers. Unlike other brands, the designer clothing is more than just clothes, they are a piece of art. After looking at the price tag the customer needs to understand what went into this piece from the start.

Image source – Pinterest


Luxury is not something we need, it’s something we want. The people in today’s world need a lot of attention wherever they go and whatever they do. As they couldn’t get the same free publicity as the models walking down the catwalk in jeans and platform sneakers get via spectators in looking at the models at the fashion shows whose photos end up in the multiple newspapers and social media. So people need to be a little creative to draw attention to the brand they are wearing and get mentioned in different news outlets. Also people want to feel like superstars for which they can spend million bucks as they have a pretty big ego.

Unlike typical store brands, luxury brands are pretty expensive due to the better materials used for the clothing, the longevity of the clothing, the production cost of the limited designer pieces that they create, research and development of the product, strategic brand positioning and the fact they know that they can make the products which would be sold and give them profit in return. For example: “Burberry”, “Gucci”, “Fendi”, “Armani” and lots of more. Luxury brands also spend a lot of money in marketing along with creating exclusivity. Brands spend millions on fashion shows, celebrity and social media endorsements, photographers, models, ads and ad placement in the proper magazines.


“Luxury is in each detail.”

– Hubert De Givenchy

So, most of the money that the customers pay for clothes goes to the department that convinces them that they need those items in the first place. To cover their production cost and make a profit, the brand sells it for at least the double that they paid to the factory for making the piece. Usually luxury brands don’t make 100 pieces rather they make 1 or 2 pieces which drives up the cost as well as the retail prices. Manufacturing small runs of pieces becomes more expensive than the bulk produced. Therefore, the exclusivity and unattainability makes it desirable for the product and they are willing to pay for the product irrespective of the cost because many people love buying designer items as each piece lasts for years with them and becomes a token item in their closet.

Luxury brands being non expensive could be bought by everyone, and would not be able to keep their high status any longer and they would not be called as “designer” and hence would lose their luxury name. These high retail prices keep the products from being obtainable by everyone, which is the sole purpose of luxury fashion.


Authors:
Divya Karan
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Sonal Dalvi
2nd Year, Fashion Design