Shopping – Impulsive OR Intentional!

The designs, the colours, the textures, ah! Human psychology compels us to buy items due to their appealing nature. Though many people are passionate shoppers, claiming that they are ‘obsessed’ is quite another ball game.
Shopping is an everyday activity until it becomes addictive. A portmanteau derived from shop + alcoholic, ‘shopaholics,’ are two kinds. The people concerned with festooning a fashionable aura around themselves while keeping (or trying to keep) a check on their finances is of a positive type.

What on earth could be the other then? You guessed it!

A other type looks for excuses to splurge on unnecessary products they probably never touch. They ultimately end up feeling guilty but cannot control themselves easily.

HIT OF DOPAMINE – CAN’T BE WORN AGAIN

Some triggers provoke the buyer into purchasing unnecessary products. When items – however unnecessary – are affordable, a rush of anxiety kicks in, thus influencing the buyer to make that purchase quickly. Sales and flea markets prey on this vulnerability. Buyers are urged to make impulsive decisions, compounded when one is a shopaholic. Another such trigger is clutter: it is easy for shopaholics to go out and buy clothes compared to spending hours decluttering and organising what they already have. Impulsive shopping is not safe: it increases troubles like monetary concerns and mental stress.

OH NO – I”M FINE WITH FOMO 

On the other hand, intentional shopping is being able to control your expenditure by spending within your means. Cut your coat according to your cloth: this proverb is true indeed. Even if we are clumsy in a few instances in our lives, we go on working in specific ways – with routines, schedules and other structures – organizing our way through it all. It serves a profound purpose: to be under self-supervision and resist addictive activities (like excessive shopping). There is no negativity in intentional shopping. These shoppers find healthy ways to properly dispose of clothes (after their intense use). It is widely considered that a simple life devoid of clutter and excess is a genuinely wonderful life.

Intentional versus Impulsive: there is a fine line between these terms and, what’s more, a tough one to balance. You may not even realize you are addicted before you are overwhelmed with baggage (both physical and mental!) to get rid of. On which side of this precarious line do you fall?


Author:
Humpy Adepu
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Atash Coyaji
2nd Year, B. Des. Textile & Product Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication

Luxury Brands Shrugging the Pandemic

After the pandemic, there has been a significant shift in consumer behaviour owing to the rise of work-from-home culture resulting in an increase in internet shopping. In terms of the internet and the online world, luxury companies are not early adopters. Read on to see why!

Luxury companies’ digital sprint
Luxury brands are wary of the internet because they want to keep their items mysterious and hard to acquire. The brands seek to preserve their uniqueness and character by maintaining secrecy. From the way fashion shows are presented to how items are sold, the luxury fashion business is evolving at a fast rate. Brands are transitioning from physical modes to online in a more planned way than ever before.

Fashion show concept
There has been talk about whether physical fashion shows can still take place. The ever Bold-and-Beautiful Gucci has already opted not to follow the timetable of fashion shows! Nonetheless, the occasion has caused firms to consider new innovative ways to debut a fashion show. This year has seen a slew of memorable digital-only fashion presentations including Raf Simon and Miuccia Prada’s debut fashion show for Spring 2021.

Prada Spring RTW 2021


The main issue encountered during the internet fashion show was that it was extremely difficult to produce the same level of enthusiasm as the physical ones, but the big potential was to provide customers with the same level of access that top reviewers typically had. Isn’t that marvelous?
Luxury brands have been producing a stream of narrative videos this year with the video material being emotive and mirroring current events like Alexander McQueen’s ‘first light’ film for its Spring 2021 campaign. The video creates a more meaningful and deep connection than word and image.

Alexander McQueen’s ‘First Light’ Collection

E-commerce
There was a huge increase in product sales through the online medium in 2020, and predictions say it will remain the same in 2021. This emphasized that there is a digital shift within luxury brands. The online fashion e-commerce platforms that were used by the brands are Farfetch, Mytheresa, Yoox Net-a-porter, Zalando Matches Fashion and Moda Operandi.
You will be intrigued to know that not only e-commerce but also the emerge of different selling modes has been affected! For instance, livestreaming has become popular in the world. Instagram is now bolstering the social commerce option.
Livestreaming is seen as a viable alternative for reaching customers in lower-tier cities because they do not have access to some physical stores. However, some people believe it critical for elite companies to maintain consistency in content quality. Some procedures, such as fitting reservations or ordering online and picking up in a store, have been around for a long time and have become considerably popular.

Gucci live


Gucci has released a new app named “Gucci Live” available in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The app insists on bringing the brand closer to its clients because the brand believes that only online purchasing lacks intimacy. Customers can speak with a genuine sales professional in the shop to ensure that the service quality is maintained. It is interactive, and users can use augmented reality to try on different garments and accessories. They can even create their own Gucci footwear in the app. People think it is loads of fun, and it helps to tackle the problem of closed physical businesses through new and creative solutions. Nonetheless, it is critical for brands to build the infrastructure necessary for long-term objectives. This seems to be true not only for Gucci but for all luxury labels. Customers must be enticed to interact online by fashion players finding innovative ways to thrill them.
To paraphrase, brands must adapt their tactics by rapidly determining which trends will persist after the ongoing crisis has passed. People are aiming for minimal change or a heavy reliance on specific markets/platforms. As a result, premium businesses must prioritise digital transformation. Brands must set clear, long-term objectives in 2021 while exhibiting enough flexibility, speed and agility to manage an uncertain short-term future.
Despite the fact that this notion has been debated for some time, the pandemic has accelerated the need for change. Physical stores are no longer physical stores, and online businesses are no longer simply online businesses.


Author:
Siddharth Bhardwaj
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication

Editors:
Atash Coyaji
2nd Year, B. Des. Textile Product Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Indrani Roy
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Re-Shirt 2021: Rethink, Revamp, Restyle

“Creativity is making marvelous out of the discarded.”

Reshirt 2021 was the second event by “Design Hub – A peer space for Budding Designers,” an initiative of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology (ASFDT), Mumbai, organized to promote aspiring designers across the country. Moreover, to promote the best ideas and implementations of fashion & design, inviting many young talents from across the country with extraordinary ideas and intellect.

Reshirt 2021 contest was all about recreating and reconstructing their old T-shirts into something entirely new. The sole aim of this exercise was to create new and trendy pieces while producing zero waste. Reshirt was a PAN India Inter-University event managed by the ASFDT, Mumbai team. It got an excellent rate of participation with over more than 40 responses. Participants showcased their creative skills by styling and remodelling their reconstructed Tees. This event had a great social media reach as well.

Various universities actively participated in this event, such as Amity University Mumbai, Amity University Noida, Amity University Chhattisgarh, Amity School of Fashion Design and Technology Uttar Pradesh, Delhi University, Maharaja SayajiRao University, Good Samaritan School, National Institute of Fashion Technology, NIFT Panchkula, Institute of home economics and more.

The winners of the Reshirt contest were-

Nishi Bhartia, who grabbed the 1st position:

Nishi Bhartia, First Position

Aarchi Arora as 1st runner-up:

Archi Arora, First Runner-up

Sreyaparna Dey and Sumedha Shettipally as 2nd runners up.

Sreyaparna Dey, Second Runner-up
Sumedha Shettipally, Second Runner-up

It was an honor for the team to have Ms. Sejal Thakur, fashion stylist at Marks and Spencer’s and Ms. Smrutiseema Nayak, Visual Merchandising Manager at H&M as the external jury members along with the professors at ASFDT who judged the contest.

The winners were given e-certificates of achievement and were featured on ASFDT’S social media handles. Meanwhile all the participants were given E-certificates for participation to acknowledge and encourage their participation.

Overall, the contest turned out to be an exciting and participative event. The team at DesignHub and ASFDT looks forward to more such exciting events in order to keep discovering hidden young hidden talents of the country.


Author:
Aditi Mandlik
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

StyleQ’21 – 13th Edition

As we usher in the New year 2022, Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology unveils the 13th edition of its StyleQ magazine. Launched in 2016 the StyleQ magazine now in its 6th year has reached a new milestone evolved from traditional magazine format to the most interactive digital flipbook look which brings 2Dcontent to life. The whole experience is curated, designed edited, and published by the students of ASFDT, showcasing their journalistic and scholastic prowess.

This issue of StyleQ holds the Trend & Colour Forecast for the Fall/Winter 2021, a sneak-peek into happenings of ASFDT, the launch of Design Hub, and well-researched articles on innovation, acknowledging insights on fashion & other creative fields that shed light on new-age trends and technology which is germane to our theme.

Click on the link below to access the trendy, digital “flip-bookStyleQ Magazine, 13th Edition.

*Please zoom on the text when accessing the Flip-book magazine for an enhanced experience.


Regards,
Team StyleQ | Team StyleQ Digital | Team ASFDT

DENIMatic 2021 – Dominate the Denim

DENIMatic 2021 was the launch event by “DesignHub – A Peer Space for Budding Designers”, which is an initiative of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai, organized with the objective to promote aspiring designers across the country.

“Everything begins with an idea”Earl Nightingale

The DENIMatic 2021 contest was about creatively styling 1 denim piece of clothing into 3 distinctive styles showcasing the stylist’s creativity and ideation. The inter-university event managed by Team ASFDT stood out for its excellent responses – higher than any previous online event conducted by ASFDT during the pandemic. Participants from multiple universities and cities submitted their ideas to showcase their creativity and styling skills as designers and models. Participants were free to share the contest details across social media, and the reach turned out to be the ultimate so far.

Amity University (Mumbai), Amity University (Noida), Footwear Design and Development Institute (Noida), Maharaja Sayajirao University (Vadodara), Acharya Institute of Graduate Studies (Bengaluru), IITC Ghatkopar (Mumbai), Whistling Woods International (Mumbai), Rachana Sansad SFTD (Mumbai), S.V.T College of Home Science, Juhu (Mumbai), Lakshmibai College at Delhi University (Delhi), and Indian Institute of Crafts and Design (Jaipur) are the notable institutes whose talented students participated in the innovative contest.

The winners of the contest are –

FirstDivya Singh, Amity School of Fashion Technology, Noida
First Runner Up – Sneha Patel, MS University of Baroda
Second Runner Up – Rashi Aggarwal, Lakshmibai College
Third Runner Up – Chinmayi Sawant, Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai

Notably, Mr. Kinshuk Das, who is currently handling the Oxemberg Design Team at Siyaram’s Silk Mills Ltd., also associated with BARE, Denims, KILLER, Pepe Jeans, and who graduated from NIFT Kolkata in 2005, was an external jury member for the contest alongside the professors at ASFDT Mumbai.

The winners were awarded with E-certificates of achievement and featured on ASFDT’s social media handles while all the participants were presented with participation E-certificates to reward their creativity too.

A collage made by the works of the following participants:1)Chinmayi Sawant, Amity school of Fashion design & technology, Mumbai; 2) Rashi Agarwal,Lakshmibai College, University of Delhi;3)Kannu Priya, , Amity school of Fashion design & technology, Mumbai; 4) Divya Singh,Amity School Of Fashion Technology, Noida; 5) Sneha Patel, The Maharaja Sayajirao University,Baroda; 6) Surbhi Kumari, School of Fashion Technology,Pune ; 7) Pooja Jadhav,Whistling Woods International,Goregaon; 8) Snigdha Agraj, Footwear Design and Development Institute, Noida; 9) Richie Patil, Amity School of Fashion Technology, Noida

Conclusively, this contest marked the beginning of an exciting initiative to build for a more creative future with the budding designers of today, and we look forward to seeing more exciting contests and events which will be fully backed by our mentors, team members and peers at ASFDT.

Lastly, we extend our gratitude to all those who contributed to the success of this event.

Stay home, stay safe!


Author:
Humpy Adepu
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Sameeksha Mukim
2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Styling & Image Design
Sushmita Mandal
2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Webinar: Creating Correspondence within Textile Culture

The act of sewing is a process of repair.”

What is thriving with increasing globalisation is the Textile industry. Traditionally, textiles have been an integral segment of human values and material culture.

Studying this field is an engrossing experience, and the students of Amity University, Mumbai had absolute glee witnessing this two-hour webinar on 9th of March 2021 about “Textile Industry and It’s Dynamics”. The spokesman was, the erudite, Mr. Raja M. Shanmugam, The president of Tirupur Exporters Association, Chief Mentor at NIFT – TEA Knitwear Fashion Industry and Founder of Confederation of Indian Industry.

The session answered many captivating questions like how the textile and clothing industry is influenced by the economic downswing. The session also explained the theory behind international contraction of consumption and the cost of inflationary inputs. Apart from the aforthmentioned, the key speaker also expounded the concept of sustainability and his interpretation on measures that shall make sustainability a practice for long run and initiatives to stay committed in future.

The webinar was concluded with an inquisitive discussion. Sir Shanmugam insightfully answered questions relating to the current situation of the pandemic, online shopping, the choice of natural fabric over synthetic ones and so on. The webinar was an absolute food for thought that acknowledged many subjects of the textile field that entranced even the faculty at ASFDT.


Author:
Sameeksha Mukim
1st Year, B.Des, Fashion Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
1st Year, B. Des, Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
1st Year, B.Des, Fashion Communication

Are Your Fashion Choices Green Enough?

Fashion is strongly intertwined with the environment. From a conceptual standpoint, consumers adopt the latest trends according to the fashion ‘season’ which follows the natural seasons. Another link (between fashion and the environment) is a physical one: the very materials used to construct garments. Even if the garments are constructed using synthetic fibres, their usage and disposal ultimately affects the world we live in.

As an environmental concern, Fashion must be an eco-friendly concept. This industry contributes 10% of global carbon emissions annually (more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined) making it extremely polluting. The eco-friendlier our wardrobe, the better it is for the environment.

Sustainable Fashion involves production, distribution and use of garments that are environmentally friendly. Adopting this will certainly contribute positively to the quality of our surroundings. These practices avoid using materials that contain harmful chemicals and reduce water consumption as well as waste production.

LENZINGTM ECOVERO TM is a sustainable fibre brand for apparel. Their branded viscose fibres (viscose: a polymer similar to rayon) are made from sustainable wood and pulp. They also have efficient water utilisation rates. Water used to produce a 150 gram t-shirt is 12.5 litres lesser than generic viscose and 210 litres lesser than conventional cotton. Reduced carbon emission is a splendid bonus. This wonderful production has been awarded the EU Ecolabel: it has met high environmental standards. Another brilliant feature is that these fibres biodegrade in three months only.

Fashion can influence our personality. It can help define our character, mindset, habits and so on. Go through your wardrobe: what are all the garments you have? Are you working towards keeping your wardrobe as sustainable as you can? Are your fashion choices green enough?


Author:
Nithuna Suresh K
2nd Year, B.des, Fashion Design
Atash Coyaji
1st Year, B.des, Textile Product Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
1st Year, B.es, Fashion Communication.

Rent The Runway

The online ‘Rental Fashion’ market in India has been on its peak with mushrooming startups and classic brands attracting the posh. The new age fashionistas believe in renting, rather than buying expensive designer wear. Turning up at a high profile luxury event in clothes that are rented and not owned isn’t a taboo anymore rather a new normal for the elites. A hectic social life coupled with the onslaught of social media has made repeating ones clothing or accessory almost unforgivable and even social harakiri. Circumstantially it makes little sense to invest thousands of rupees on clothes that will be worn once and be relegated to a corner in the closet.

A decade ago, renting high-end luxury or designer wear was more or less unheard of. Women who didn’t want to purchase an expensive dress for a one-time event were left to borrow it from a friend. Designer gown and accessory rentals were the exclusive territory of celebrities and their stylists.

While the international market is huge for wardrobe rental services, with successful ventures like rent the Runway, Lending Luxury, Girl Meets Dress, etc, for India this trend is still taking its baby steps. Shilpa Bhatia, an erstwhile Hindi film stylist, was among the first few to tap into the potential of luxury rental as early as in 2005 when she launched ‘The Clothing Rental’ in Mumbai. The Clothing Rental thrives today with two stores in Mumbai apart from an online presence. Offering similar deals are a number of online fashion rentals, including flyrobe.com, swishlist.in, stylebank.in, liberent.com and stage3.co.

Renting outfits has become common for those once-in-a-lifetime events (wedding, mehendi, sangeet, bridal showers, and bachelorette parties) that require a level of luxury that’s not necessarily worth the long-term investment. For instance, Flyrobe which claims to have partnered with designer labels like Outhouse, Masaba Gupta, Ritu Kumar, and Shehla Khan supplies western wear on-demand with a three-hour delivery timeline and the ethnic wear on advance booking. 

The concept of luxury rental is simple: Customers can choose from designer garments, handbags, sunglasses, jewellery and other accessories they like, rent it for a couple of days at a fraction of the retail price and then return it; so easy!. The courier is then picked up from your doorstep back to where it belongs. Some companies even allow the person to own it by paying the retail price for the item.

In today’s time, when everything is for everyone, the allure of ‘no ownership’ moves beyond housing and cars bringing High-End Fashion to its dawn as one of the biggest rental industries . It assures satisfaction to the customer’s desire for a luxury product without endangering their kidneys. The new generation raves multiple experiences and desires to be fashionable and trendy, without the pressure of a permanent commitment.


Author: Vasanti Choudhary 2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Indrani Roy
1st Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Midi-Skirts & Boots – Never Outta Style

Midi-skirt with boots- a combination anyone would love to wear. Flared midi-skirts when worn with ankle boots give out a whole ‘retro yet trendy‘ look. What sets apart the midi-skirts from all other skirts is the style and the length of it which ends right at the wildest part of your leg; the mid-calf, giving the illusion that your calf thicker than it really is. Similarly ankle boots cover the thinnest part of our legs that is the ankle. Some may say that styling Midi-skirts with ankle boots maybe risky but if done well and carried with confidence, it surely is a feast.

Sometimes it may be recommended to wear neutral/nude coloured boots that go with skin colour of the wearer and create an illusion of elongated legs rather than the regular dark coloured boots that give away a stumpy look. Unlike this, many stylists or fashion influencers over Instagram, YouTube or blogs style dark coloured boots with solid pastel or neon, flared midi-skirts or even with retro printed midi-skirts aiming for a grunge look.

Thus, depending on the wearer and how well they style and carry an outfit, midi-skirts and boots together are a combination that never go out of style.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Remembering Pierre Cardin

Pierre Cardin (02.07.22 – 29.12.20) was an Italian-born, naturalized-French fashion designer who was known for his Avant-garde and Space Age designs. 

He was a visionary designer who with his natural yet revolutionary designs, transformed the business of fashion. He clothed the elite but also reached the masses by affixing his name to an outpouring of merchandise ranging from off-the-rack apparel to bath towels. The French Fashion Designer passed away on 29th December 2020 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, just outside Paris at the age of 98.

Cardin went from the world of bespoke high fashion for private clients to ready-to-wear designs for the masses. From bubble dresses to aviator jumpsuits, fragrances to automobiles, ashtrays and even pickle jars, Pierre Cardin has his brand name inscribed on everything. Pierre Cardin planted his flag on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris, where he proceeded to turn the country’s fashion establishment on its head, reproducing fashions for mass, ready-to-wear consumption and taking on a blow to the elitism that had governed the Parisian couture. 

Cardin’s looks are based on geometry; it’s sculptural and sometimes kinetic. His designs also tend to the clean and minimal, and it’s been applied to dresses, furniture and even real estate. During his more than seven glorious decades spent in fashion industry, he brought geometric shapes to haute couture and made sure to carve the name of his brand on everything, from clothing to perfume to pens.

Pierre Cardin was one of the last men standing from the Golden Age of couture, having helped give birth to Christian Dior’s New Look, his technical ability is indisputable. Cardin was the only Paris couturier, outside of Balenciaga, who was not only a designer, but an excellent fitter and cutter.

Remembering the legendary fashion designer and his life happenings, his early works from 1950s to the 70s and his later works from the 70s to late 90s, the students of ASFDT were asked to make an inspiring and creative story on the 9th of January.

The students of Semester 1 & 4 with each group of 5 had to create an illustration per student, of his works.

The students of Semester 6 & M.Des with each group of 5 had to create a physical model and take pictures or videos of the making process. All works had to be created using available materials. 

Best works were displayed on ASFDT’s Instagram account as well as the StyleQ Digital Blog.


Author:
Dona Ajay
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Artworks by:
Students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology,
Amity University Mumbai