Amity Students : Re-describing Textile & Household Fabric Waste Sustainably.

चिंदी written in Devanagari script stands for small bits of fabric, encountered either as textile waste or more commonly residue of fabrics from household use. That was exactly the inspiration for the designer to make the most out of a huge number of waste fabric pieces that go to the dumpster. Chindi means a labour of love. Combining the passion for knitting, braiding, crocheting and recycling together for fashion was the designer’s main aim. The art of Chindi was born to promote rural handicrafts and not simply something our grandmothers once did.

Sejal Thakur showcasing her collection Punarkala


I presented the collection at Bombay times fashion week name Punarkala the labour of love on 13th of March 2020. I walked the ramp as my name was called out “ Sejal Thakurr” designer but the collection was devoted to all the women sitting in rural Maharashtra, who helped me from stage one. The point was not exclusively to create just any other collection that would have looked pretty or beautiful on the ramp, however it was to help ladies in rural Maharashtra by generating a source of income for them.

Designer – Sejal Thakur

The collection was a resort wear collection with Chindi fabric that was created from scratch as well as bright hand spun Khadi fabric. It communicated something specific that you can look in vogue and still have fun with your garments while being fashionably responsible. The collection of two skirts, top coordinates, one dress, one pant and top along with the showstopper cape all have just one thrust – the unification of tradition and modernity.


Authors:
Sejal Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Muskan Syed
1st Year, Fashion Design

Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Abhirami Vishnu
2nd Year, Textile Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photo credits:
Sejal Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Special thanks to:
Sushrut Koche
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Amity Students : Reframing Jamdani

A walk down the memory lane is always a refreshing and an enriching experience. The collection Nishabdh by Amit Shil set forth an extravagant form of aesthetic fondness. Jamdani is a special woven fabric in cotton. The weave done by loom on brocade is a time-consuming process and is a blend of figures and floral motifs. It’s origin is from one of ancient textile weaving centers in Dhaka, Bangladesh.


The designer showed personal interest in the construction of the fabric and thus, visited the spot where Jamdani is manufactured in Kolkata, West Bengal. He had the luxury of getting the basic weaving knowledge about the fabric in a more technical aspect, thus enhancing his interest in designing garments using the Jamdani fabric.

The colour white was chosen as a sign of elegance, sophistication and luxury along with a sense of power and confidence. The colour brings out the beautiful weave of the fabric as well as the classy silhouettes bringing forth a priceless look over all

According to me, ‘inspiration is something that comes from the within and from the moments we have lived,’ and I have spent most of my childhood seeing my mother wear Jamdani sarees and tell me about how elegant yet comfortable they were. My collection Nishabdh is a contemporary variant of the time-old classics. The blazers are classic silhouettes and so is the fabric of Jamdani. This combination speaks for itself as a face of ‘Powerful Elegance’.

Designer Amit Shil


The Oversized yet structural silhouettes and overemphasized sleeves pushed boundaries of accepted style by giving a powerful yet elegant appearance. The collection is presented with a combination of an oversized blazer with edgy cuts and with a very delicate fabric such as Jamdani. He intends to show everyone about how elegance is not just an abstraction.


Authors:
Sthuthya Shaminder
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Snehal Gaikar
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Andrew Joseph
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Technology
Sushrut Koche
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.


Amity Students: Combining Heritage Indian Arts with Challenging Textures for Fashion Week

Fashion has always been a repetition of ideas, but what makes it new is the way you put it together.

– Carolina Herrera.

Keeping this quote in mind, student of Amity School of Fashion Designing and Technology Mumbai, Miss Aksshaya Venkat showcased her debut collection titled Chitra Varnan on the platform of Bombay Times Fashion Week Spring-Summer 2020.

Her collection spoke about traditional Indian arts, painstakingly woven and painted in order to promote Slow Fashion. The theme of the collection was Greek-o-Bohemian, which had hand painted Kalamkari inspired from the famous motif of the ‘tree of life,’ and the beauty of nature with elements of flora and fauna with vivid traditional colours. The collection had elements of leather which was laser cut and intricately woven into a handmade fabric. Mixing masculine fabrics such as leather with soft feminine fabrics like silk made it even more creative and special to the designer. The accessories were made with feathers, beads and leather braids which complimented perfectly with the entire Greek-o-Bohemian appeal.

Chitra Varnan is one of my dearest works. Mixing leather weaving and hand painted silk Kalamkari was challenging but the outcome was wholesome and beautiful. The ‘tree of life’ motif used in the garments, is very symbolic to my journey from being a student to entering the fashion industry. It’s been my dream to bring in more unique combinations of rich heritage Indian arts and crafts into my future collections because they are to be treasured and preserved for the future generations.

Designer Aksshaya Venkat

The designer-student Aksshaya, with perseverance, determination and the help of faculty members and students of ASFDT, successfully showcased her debut collection at BTFW 2020.


Authors:
Deeplaxmi Naik
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Dona Ajay
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Sonal Dalvi
2nd Year, Textile Design

Photographers:
Andrew Joseph
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Design
Sushrut Koche,
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.


Amity Students: Combining The Artistry of Chikankari & Ajrakh for Fashion Week.

The collection named ‘Kashish’ which means ‘Attraction’ in Urdu was presented at The Bombay Times Fashion Week by Divya Karan and Ankita Aggarwal, 3rd year Fashion Design students of ASFDT.

The designers used fabrics that displayed femininity as well as boldness of the wearer.  Kashish brought out the inner beauty of the wearer, making her feel empowered, supreme yet graceful.

The use of delicately hand embroidered Chikankari on georgette by a group of five rural women as a legacy of Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh was coupled with hand printed, Indigo and Madder dyed Ajrakh, an art from the state of Gujarat.

This extraordinary combination of Ajrakh and Chikankari transforms our love for Traditional Indian Textiles in high street fashion with contemporary silhouettes. Through this collection we have tried to bring out the fact that high street fashion can also be worn without losing our traditionality and the customs. Kashish makes the wearer feel attached to their states and spreads social connectivity among the states.

– Designers Divya Karan & Ankita Aggarwal

Both, the fabrics and the designs, brought out the theme of ‘traditional Indian textiles with a contemporary silhouette’ creatively, yet gracefully.


Authors:
Divya Karan 
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Ankita Aggarwal
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Andrew Jospeh
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Design
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology Shines at Bombay Times Fashion Week 2020

Bombay Times Fashion Week ( BTFW ) is one of the country’s most coveted and star-studded fashion weeks. Designers have their hearts to showcase their collections in BTFW. It was a glorious moment for the students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai, to display their innovations in BTFW 2020 and get a delightful exposure.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology has always believed in doing fashion with a soul. The collection titled ‘Pratha’, stemmed from the fashion school’s initiative of reviving India’s cultural ethos and bringing it on the forefront of fashion. The collection was about India and how the people of the nation are still striving to keep their roots alive when it comes to traditions. Innovative designs and chic outfits were showcased by the students in four different sets.

Team ASFDT

The first collection by Aksshaya Venkat, titled ‘Chitra Varnan’, Greek-o-Bohemian, was about hand painted Kalamkari of the South inspired from the tree of life. The garments were in connection with demure leather weaving, silk and laser cutting and Greco-Bohemian statement.

Designer – Aksshaya Venkat

‘Kashish’, a collection filled with embroidered Chikankari of the North and printed Ajrak of the West, by Ankita Agarwal and Divya Karan, brought a strong attraction of visually striking colours and lightly sewn threads. They showcased modern cuts in high street ensembles with the combination of two stalwart traditional handicrafts. Mint green, maroon and indigo colours seized the attention of the spectators.

A playful and colourful atmosphere was created by Sejal Thakur with her collection, ‘Punar-Kala,’ a structured elite resort wear unleashing the sustainable handicraft of recycled textiles called Chindi. The collection was dedicated to the native artisans of Maharashtra. The leftovers fabrics were cut into strips, skilfully braided, knotted, crocheted, shaped and finally stitched together to form garments for the collection.

‘Nishabd,’ an incredible collection by Amit Shil, depicted simplicity and strength possessed by females using over-sized structural silhouettes with 3D pleated drapes. Oversized Avant-Garde androgynous ensembles in the finest fulwar jamdani with 3D Kirigami pleats in accordion pattern had a zen appeal and created a bold and emphatic style. The structured silhouettes, over-emphasized sleeves pushed boundaries of accepted style. Each model graced the ramp with elegance and power, thus making it a truly wonderful collection.

Designer – Amit Shil with his Jamdani Collection.

All the designers dedicated their precious time and effort in creating the collection, Pratha, and the support of numerous students and faculty members helped in making it a successful story for Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology.


Author:
Sthuthya Shaminder 
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Ruhi Kapoor
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Aditi Gupta
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai
.

Special Thanks:
Tanveer Khan Photography.