Are Your Fashion Choices Green Enough?

Fashion is strongly intertwined with the environment. From a conceptual standpoint, consumers adopt the latest trends according to the fashion ‘season’ which follows the natural seasons. Another link (between fashion and the environment) is a physical one: the very materials used to construct garments. Even if the garments are constructed using synthetic fibres, their usage and disposal ultimately affects the world we live in.

As an environmental concern, Fashion must be an eco-friendly concept. This industry contributes 10% of global carbon emissions annually (more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined) making it extremely polluting. The eco-friendlier our wardrobe, the better it is for the environment.

Sustainable Fashion involves production, distribution and use of garments that are environmentally friendly. Adopting this will certainly contribute positively to the quality of our surroundings. These practices avoid using materials that contain harmful chemicals and reduce water consumption as well as waste production.

LENZINGTM ECOVERO TM is a sustainable fibre brand for apparel. Their branded viscose fibres (viscose: a polymer similar to rayon) are made from sustainable wood and pulp. They also have efficient water utilisation rates. Water used to produce a 150 gram t-shirt is 12.5 litres lesser than generic viscose and 210 litres lesser than conventional cotton. Reduced carbon emission is a splendid bonus. This wonderful production has been awarded the EU Ecolabel: it has met high environmental standards. Another brilliant feature is that these fibres biodegrade in three months only.

Fashion can influence our personality. It can help define our character, mindset, habits and so on. Go through your wardrobe: what are all the garments you have? Are you working towards keeping your wardrobe as sustainable as you can? Are your fashion choices green enough?


Author:
Nithuna Suresh K
2nd Year, B.des, Fashion Design
Atash Coyaji
1st Year, B.des, Textile Product Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
1st Year, B.es, Fashion Communication.

Rent The Runway

The online ‘Rental Fashion’ market in India has been on its peak with mushrooming startups and classic brands attracting the posh. The new age fashionistas believe in renting, rather than buying expensive designer wear. Turning up at a high profile luxury event in clothes that are rented and not owned isn’t a taboo anymore rather a new normal for the elites. A hectic social life coupled with the onslaught of social media has made repeating ones clothing or accessory almost unforgivable and even social harakiri. Circumstantially it makes little sense to invest thousands of rupees on clothes that will be worn once and be relegated to a corner in the closet.

A decade ago, renting high-end luxury or designer wear was more or less unheard of. Women who didn’t want to purchase an expensive dress for a one-time event were left to borrow it from a friend. Designer gown and accessory rentals were the exclusive territory of celebrities and their stylists.

While the international market is huge for wardrobe rental services, with successful ventures like rent the Runway, Lending Luxury, Girl Meets Dress, etc, for India this trend is still taking its baby steps. Shilpa Bhatia, an erstwhile Hindi film stylist, was among the first few to tap into the potential of luxury rental as early as in 2005 when she launched ‘The Clothing Rental’ in Mumbai. The Clothing Rental thrives today with two stores in Mumbai apart from an online presence. Offering similar deals are a number of online fashion rentals, including flyrobe.com, swishlist.in, stylebank.in, liberent.com and stage3.co.

Renting outfits has become common for those once-in-a-lifetime events (wedding, mehendi, sangeet, bridal showers, and bachelorette parties) that require a level of luxury that’s not necessarily worth the long-term investment. For instance, Flyrobe which claims to have partnered with designer labels like Outhouse, Masaba Gupta, Ritu Kumar, and Shehla Khan supplies western wear on-demand with a three-hour delivery timeline and the ethnic wear on advance booking. 

The concept of luxury rental is simple: Customers can choose from designer garments, handbags, sunglasses, jewellery and other accessories they like, rent it for a couple of days at a fraction of the retail price and then return it; so easy!. The courier is then picked up from your doorstep back to where it belongs. Some companies even allow the person to own it by paying the retail price for the item.

In today’s time, when everything is for everyone, the allure of ‘no ownership’ moves beyond housing and cars bringing High-End Fashion to its dawn as one of the biggest rental industries . It assures satisfaction to the customer’s desire for a luxury product without endangering their kidneys. The new generation raves multiple experiences and desires to be fashionable and trendy, without the pressure of a permanent commitment.


Author: Vasanti Choudhary 2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Indrani Roy
1st Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Midi-Skirts & Boots – Never Outta Style

Midi-skirt with boots- a combination anyone would love to wear. Flared midi-skirts when worn with ankle boots give out a whole ‘retro yet trendy‘ look. What sets apart the midi-skirts from all other skirts is the style and the length of it which ends right at the wildest part of your leg; the mid-calf, giving the illusion that your calf thicker than it really is. Similarly ankle boots cover the thinnest part of our legs that is the ankle. Some may say that styling Midi-skirts with ankle boots maybe risky but if done well and carried with confidence, it surely is a feast.

Sometimes it may be recommended to wear neutral/nude coloured boots that go with skin colour of the wearer and create an illusion of elongated legs rather than the regular dark coloured boots that give away a stumpy look. Unlike this, many stylists or fashion influencers over Instagram, YouTube or blogs style dark coloured boots with solid pastel or neon, flared midi-skirts or even with retro printed midi-skirts aiming for a grunge look.

Thus, depending on the wearer and how well they style and carry an outfit, midi-skirts and boots together are a combination that never go out of style.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Remembering Pierre Cardin

Pierre Cardin (02.07.22 – 29.12.20) was an Italian-born, naturalized-French fashion designer who was known for his Avant-garde and Space Age designs. 

He was a visionary designer who with his natural yet revolutionary designs, transformed the business of fashion. He clothed the elite but also reached the masses by affixing his name to an outpouring of merchandise ranging from off-the-rack apparel to bath towels. The French Fashion Designer passed away on 29th December 2020 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, just outside Paris at the age of 98.

Cardin went from the world of bespoke high fashion for private clients to ready-to-wear designs for the masses. From bubble dresses to aviator jumpsuits, fragrances to automobiles, ashtrays and even pickle jars, Pierre Cardin has his brand name inscribed on everything. Pierre Cardin planted his flag on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris, where he proceeded to turn the country’s fashion establishment on its head, reproducing fashions for mass, ready-to-wear consumption and taking on a blow to the elitism that had governed the Parisian couture. 

Cardin’s looks are based on geometry; it’s sculptural and sometimes kinetic. His designs also tend to the clean and minimal, and it’s been applied to dresses, furniture and even real estate. During his more than seven glorious decades spent in fashion industry, he brought geometric shapes to haute couture and made sure to carve the name of his brand on everything, from clothing to perfume to pens.

Pierre Cardin was one of the last men standing from the Golden Age of couture, having helped give birth to Christian Dior’s New Look, his technical ability is indisputable. Cardin was the only Paris couturier, outside of Balenciaga, who was not only a designer, but an excellent fitter and cutter.

Remembering the legendary fashion designer and his life happenings, his early works from 1950s to the 70s and his later works from the 70s to late 90s, the students of ASFDT were asked to make an inspiring and creative story on the 9th of January.

The students of Semester 1 & 4 with each group of 5 had to create an illustration per student, of his works.

The students of Semester 6 & M.Des with each group of 5 had to create a physical model and take pictures or videos of the making process. All works had to be created using available materials. 

Best works were displayed on ASFDT’s Instagram account as well as the StyleQ Digital Blog.


Author:
Dona Ajay
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Artworks by:
Students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology,
Amity University Mumbai

#FlashbackFriday: Resort 2021 Menswear

The past few months have illuminated significant lessons to the world of fashion in the interminable intensity of human potential, versatility and adaptability in the face of turmoil is an understatement. The pandemic had forced designers to reconsider craftsmanship, quality, and sustainability, with many delivering more streamlined collections. 

Despite a fashion calendar hanging in the balance and an evolving industry landscape with a future yet to be uncovered, the world’s leading designers unveiled their ‘Resort Menswear Collections’ with holiday vibes being more about a state of mind and not a tour around the globe, for all the obvious reasons. While each designer had their own perspective on how to capture the pandemic experience, they all aligned in one common thread: At the end of every tunnel is a light and it’s clear it will sparkle splendidly on the inimitable legacy of creativity and self-expression.

From quirky prints to minimal aesthetics, comfy lounge-worthy pieces and coordinated sets, Resort 2021 opened up a universe of alternatives for buyers. It would not be wrong to say that in the coming year, opposite styles are going to attract and the collections have a lot to offer. Fortunately for you, we’ve managed to distil some key statements that you should be looking for in the next year.

Starting with, Dior’s Oblique tapestry B23 high-tops; a trophy in the form of a turquoise lighter and new perforated leather accessories with reflective linings to catch the light may be more than we bargained for. Also, the insanely luxurious crocodile field jacket, is all about looking like one’s coming out of the apocalypse fighting. Dior’s must-haves are a camp shirt and matching shorts set needlepointed from seam-to-seam in the familiar Dior Oblique pattern. 

Virgil Abloh’s Resort 2021 collection for Louis Vuitton revealed that in streetwear era, a green leather jacket somewhere between sage and basil, a mink jacket with an oil slick sheen, loose-fitting pants, sneakers, and a pair of exuberant bucket hats can fit in anyone’s wardrobe and shake the next summer, with doing justice to the history and craftsmanship and savoir faire of Vuitton.

Tod’s Creative Director Walter Chiapponi approached the casual elegance of the ’70s for 2021. Shades of green, bordeaux, navy- and sky-blue will work in tandem with muted tones, and tastefully incorporated flashes of color into sportswear will meet the codes of sophistication. Pair of corduroy pants and upscale blazers would take classic constructions a step forward and give a twist of cool sophistication.

Salvatore Ferragamo’s unstructured, unlined suit cut from fresh sand-toned cotton and a touch of animalier, a hybrid giraffe-leopard pattern reworked from archival motifs printed on a generous, oversized men’s shirt will exude a lively, summery feel.

Modernized elements of highly geometric aesthetic when applied on chenille cardigans bring out a powerful and fresh template. Cheerful design components, for example, polka dots, peace symbols and smiley appearances —against light hues of pale pink, light yellow and sorbet orange by Moschino will help to put a smiley face to the look.

Perhaps the easiest to pull off of next season’s trends, with an emphasis on sharp tailoring and cutting the formality of the men’s tailoring with playful touches, like the little devils that crawl up trouser legs, Off-White merges a businessman with a youthful teenager and will be the drill next year.

With a ton of opposing trends, men have the opportunity to explore hard and soft, edgy and sweet, and see which look they gravitate towards more. One might end up consolidating different expressions for a personalized flair.


Author:
Ruhi Kapoor
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Illustrator:
Mansi Lohar
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

‘Le Oversized’

Where Comfort Meets Style…

In today’s world when everybody wants comfort before anything, oversized clothing is perceptibly making its way into everyone’s closets. Oversized clothes are considered as clothes that make you look trendy while giving you enough room to breathe and be in absolute comfort. If worn in the right way, they can look just as chic and smart as fitted, well-tailored clothes.

Image source – Pinterest.in

Many designers have showcased their collection with large shirts, tunics, t-shirts and hoodies etc. The main concept of loose clothing is to be comfortable yet fashionable.
The key to stand out when wearing an oversized garment is all about ‘how you wear it.’ It is important to wear it with the right selection of pants or accessories to go with it. For
girls, they tend to give a tomboyish look with a slight hint of femininity.

A lot of A-list celebrities, both Bollywood and Hollywood alike, like to wear loose t-shirts, oversized jackets and shirts when they make an appearance in public, that later gets slotted into street style looks, airport looks or just the regular grocery-run looks into various magazines, blogs and websites.

The combination of oversized t-shirts with cute white sneakers have consistently been in trend these past couple of years. After all, when has any perfect combination of fashion and comfort gone out of style? One can safely say, that this look will be worn by students and working professionals alike, because this classic doesn’t have an age bar.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Abhirami Vishnu
3rd Year, B. Des. Textile and Product Design

StyleQ Icons: 007

“The name is Bond, James Bond”. As exquisite is this dialogue, so has been the character’s fashion legacy. From Dr. No to Spectre, from Sean Connery to Daniel Craig, each actor that portrayed 007 has maintained that evergreen aura of the character’s styling. High octane action sequences in a tuxedo have proven the functionality as well as the sophistication of a garment alike. 

In the early 90s, the book ‘Dressed to Kill’ was dedicated to the styles and trends adopted by Bond. The character, James Bond is truly a master of men’s fashion. The best attires seen on this evergreen classic character can be-

  • Pierce Brosnan’s cream coloured Brioni Herringbone linen suit which he wore with a French Blue shirt in ‘The World Is Not Enough’.
Screenshot from the movie – The World is Not Enough
  • Black Dinner Suit with flared trousers and exaggerated point collars designed by Angelo Roma and worn by Roger Moore in ‘Moonraker’.
Screenshot from the movie – Moonraker
  • Double-breasted navy blazer worn by Roger Moore, designed by his own tailor, Douglas Hayward, which he wore with Gabardine trousers in the movie ‘For Your Eyes Only’.
Screenshot from the movie – For Your Eyes Only
  • Brunello Cucinelli brown favourite lighter Khaki trousers, worn by Daniel Craig in ‘Spectre’.
Screenshot from the movie – Spectre
  • The Midnight Blue Tuxedo with black shawl collars, stylized by Jany Temime, worn by Daniel Craig in ‘Skyfall’. This attire was originally inspired by Sean Connery’s ‘Dr. No’, the first Bond film. This attire broke the rules in the most subtle manner. The rule of ‘Bond wears classics’ was broken by creating another classic.
Screenshot from the movie – Skyfall
Screenshot from the movie – Dr.No

To maintain the legacy of this great character’s style sense, it took a lot from the actors portraying it and the designers styling it. Some great designers like Anthony Sinclair and Tom Ford have worked for the franchise series. And the baton has always been passed to the rightful retaining Bond as the most evergreen and stylish character in the past.

Bond has ruled our hearts and wardrobes for decades now. A Bond suit is in every guy’s wish list, but when added, it makes a man’s wardrobe.

Enjoy the new Trailer 2 of Bond Movie – No Time To Die


Author:
Daksh Vohra
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Dona Ajay
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Lavanya Murali
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

The Age Of Hippie Modernism

In the mid 1960s, a never-seen-before hippie counter-culture blossomed throughout the United States, which incited both the Flower Power Movement and the revulsion of more straight laced. Floral clothing and growing beards all became part of the evolving counter-culture in the hippie era. The casual glamour laced with tribal totems has served fashion past and present.

When the Spring/Summer 2019 of Chloé collection started to be walked down the runway, it was showed the perfect hippie-like flared trousers, pareo skirts and twisted silk lariat belt that would fit in at Coachella Valley Music and Art Festival. The collection is called Hippie Modernism because the designer wanted to bring it into the city with an urban flair. The tribal-inspired jewellery was also added to complete hippie look. 

The collection reflected the souvenirs of the counterculture with its avant-garde constructs of sensuality, femininity and utopian progress. Considering the lives and art forms of free-spirited women, the garments were graced by traditional textures and styling like scarf silks, ikat and bias-cut layering. The designs were basically the evolution of a new mentality following the original Hippie culture.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

“Whoever said Money can’t buy happiness simply didn’t know where to go shopping” – A Shopaholic’s Confession

My name is Prarthana and I have a problem. Actually I have 268 problems and if you count the three pairs of shoes at my aunt’s house and all the clothes my friends probably have, I would break 300.

I like clothes. I like shoes. I love the excitement of buying something new and the anticipation of wearing it. I like how my newly bought things smell like pure bliss. I love how beautiful things look when they are presented on the display and I love the feeling after knowing that I can afford that and later add it to my nearly overflowing closet.

There are certain instances where I do know when and where to spend my money but that never means that I don’t have the tiny tingle or urge inside of me to go and buy the thing I’ve been eyeing secretly. But, I tell myself what Rebecca Bloomwood kept telling herself – “Do I really need this ?” And I hope to convince myself to not buy whatsoever the item is, which apparently was something Rebecca wasn’t very good at ( seriously! If you don’t know Rebecca Bloomwood please do yourself a favour and go watch ‘Confessions of a Shopaholic’ ).

So what is it that makes me and a million others want to buy things off the rack even though most of the time we may not even need them ? 

“Luxury” traditionally is linked to excess and ostentatiousness. But forget the terms of the past, we now live in a society that appeals to the senses. Luxury nowadays is“being” instead of “having”. Materialistic objects lose their senses if they are coupled only with the desire of having.

Correct marketing is very essential in luxury fashion, which must attract a customer not just for a top quality and wonder of the thing , but also to an environment that a particular brand conveys.

Making the consumer feel attracted to the brand environment as well as desiring to be part of a certain “club”is the magic ingredient.

Champagnes, biscuits and other goodies, good music, a pleasing smell, soft fabrics and well-dressed staff are very strong tools to attract new customers and to retain the loyal ones.

Hence, our “inside voices” keep telling us to go there over and over again ‘cause they said, “mam this dress fits you as if it were made for you and it enhances your aura and it doesn’t just make you look like a queen but also, feel like one.” And from that part to the part where you swipe your card all you can think about is ‘I look like a Queen’, now tell me who wouldn’t like to look like one?


Authors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, Fashion Design

Flashback Friday: Some of our favourites from The New York Fashion Week

Christopher John Rogers

His work is dramatic, stunning and sensational. His work is defined by neon colors, voluminous skirts, broad shoulders, sparkles and sky-high heels. The colours used were bright: orange, safety green and fuchsia. Suits were embellished with Swarovski crystals. Evening gowns were long and voluminous. He brought back the strawberry shaped waist, which reappeared on the runway in violet, the French cinematic clowns with ruffled necklines. As for new inspirations, he cited trash bags, he says that a curtain brushing the floor in a Renaissance painting has the same energy as a crumpled garbage bag. Rogers’s creativity has come of age at a time of gender fluidity and personal declarations of fabulousness.

NYFW 2020 – Cristopher John Rogers

Brandon Maxwell

Brandon Maxwell shows are typically pretty boisterous affairs. This time out, the neutrals felt like an afterthought, with bold shades of pink, red and orange playing the starring roles, and a kicky lipstick print doing a showy cameo. While it felt more subdued than some of his previous work, by bringing back the simplest elements like neutral, monotone color palettes on slinky shapes with his sharp tailoring skills. Flowing chiffon capes cut away to reveal low-cut pants, while a shrunken leather jacket hit just right at the hips. The emphasis was on fabrication with some very showy materials, such as a liquid-looking tortoiseshell, but mainstays were textiles with a strong sense of hand, like the suede, velvety corduroy, dense alpaca, and buttery cashmere.

NYFW 2020 – Brandon Maxwell

Fe Noel

Felisha Noel, who is a Grenadian Brooklyn based designer and owner of the line has created a much-deserved buzz in the industry and it continues to pay homage to the black experience in West Indian/African countries through its colourful pieces. The show started with a celebratory spirit that lived in the room that not many shows have. From the signature Fe Noel wide-leg pants adorned with colorful stripes to plaid co-ordinates and romantic silk dresses, the entire collection was art. It was colorful, feminine, and expressive. The robes in the collection were vibrant, with printed patterns that left you eager to visit the islands. There were dreamy sheer fabrics, mint plaids, and vibrant reds that all paid homage to Noel’s roots. Just by seeing the clothes and its craftsmanship, one could understand how proud she was of her ancestry through the designs. 

NYFW 2020 – Fe Noel

Prabal Gurung

The Nepalese-American fashion designer Prabal Gurung launched his line in 2009 at New York Fashion Week. The designer’s line is now sold in over twenty countries, is featured in fashion’s top publications and is regularly worn by those in the public eye. Gurung has focused on politics as the center of his shows since President Trump took office. The show opened with a white tuxedo with black revers and stripes down the legs. The tux established the formal mood, but from there he roamed widely, touching on knit dressing, a colorful floral print on silk jacquard, and voluminous going-out tops worn with trousers. Feathers took a lead role and crystals played the costar. It’s always exciting to witness a designer breaking with his formula.

NYFW 2020 – Prabal Gurung

Authors:
Dona Ajay
2nd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Illustrator:
Mansi Lohar
3rd Year, Fashion Design