DENIMatic 2021 – Dominate the Denim

DENIMatic 2021 was the launch event by “DesignHub – A Peer Space for Budding Designers”, which is an initiative of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai, organized with the objective to promote aspiring designers across the country.

“Everything begins with an idea”Earl Nightingale

The DENIMatic 2021 contest was about creatively styling 1 denim piece of clothing into 3 distinctive styles showcasing the stylist’s creativity and ideation. The inter-university event managed by Team ASFDT stood out for its excellent responses – higher than any previous online event conducted by ASFDT during the pandemic. Participants from multiple universities and cities submitted their ideas to showcase their creativity and styling skills as designers and models. Participants were free to share the contest details across social media, and the reach turned out to be the ultimate so far.

Amity University (Mumbai), Amity University (Noida), Footwear Design and Development Institute (Noida), Maharaja Sayajirao University (Vadodara), Acharya Institute of Graduate Studies (Bengaluru), IITC Ghatkopar (Mumbai), Whistling Woods International (Mumbai), Rachana Sansad SFTD (Mumbai), S.V.T College of Home Science, Juhu (Mumbai), Lakshmibai College at Delhi University (Delhi), and Indian Institute of Crafts and Design (Jaipur) are the notable institutes whose talented students participated in the innovative contest.

The winners of the contest are –

FirstDivya Singh, Amity School of Fashion Technology, Noida
First Runner Up – Sneha Patel, MS University of Baroda
Second Runner Up – Rashi Aggarwal, Lakshmibai College
Third Runner Up – Chinmayi Sawant, Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai

Notably, Mr. Kinshuk Das, who is currently handling the Oxemberg Design Team at Siyaram’s Silk Mills Ltd., also associated with BARE, Denims, KILLER, Pepe Jeans, and who graduated from NIFT Kolkata in 2005, was an external jury member for the contest alongside the professors at ASFDT Mumbai.

The winners were awarded with E-certificates of achievement and featured on ASFDT’s social media handles while all the participants were presented with participation E-certificates to reward their creativity too.

A collage made by the works of the following participants:1)Chinmayi Sawant, Amity school of Fashion design & technology, Mumbai; 2) Rashi Agarwal,Lakshmibai College, University of Delhi;3)Kannu Priya, , Amity school of Fashion design & technology, Mumbai; 4) Divya Singh,Amity School Of Fashion Technology, Noida; 5) Sneha Patel, The Maharaja Sayajirao University,Baroda; 6) Surbhi Kumari, School of Fashion Technology,Pune ; 7) Pooja Jadhav,Whistling Woods International,Goregaon; 8) Snigdha Agraj, Footwear Design and Development Institute, Noida; 9) Richie Patil, Amity School of Fashion Technology, Noida

Conclusively, this contest marked the beginning of an exciting initiative to build for a more creative future with the budding designers of today, and we look forward to seeing more exciting contests and events which will be fully backed by our mentors, team members and peers at ASFDT.

Lastly, we extend our gratitude to all those who contributed to the success of this event.

Stay home, stay safe!


Author:
Humpy Adepu
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Lubaina Surury
2nd Year, B. Des. Fashion Communication
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Sameeksha Mukim
2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Styling & Image Design
Sushmita Mandal
2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

In Talks: With Bright Young Designers

With the Finalists of #Coronial_Innovate Design Contest 2020


“True sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.”

ASFDT along with Club Ami-Trendz conducted the ‘Coronial Innovate Design Contest’ on Innovation Day which is celebrated on 28th September 2020.

10 finalists were selected out of 65 entries from various schools of AUM, namely Avni Singhal (M.Des Sem 3), Nikhitha Jayakumar (Sem 7), Akarshi Shrivastava (Sem 7), Vasanti Choudhary (Sem 5), Arundhati Abipsha (Sem 5), Chinmayi Sawant (Sem 5), Dona Ajay (Sem 5), Aishwarya Babar (Sem 3), Sushmita Mandal (Sem 1) & Anushree (MT).

With ‘Versatile Geometry’ as the theme the contestants were asked to create a design for a mask and pair of gloves with their own creativity and innovation added to it. Their ideation and design thinking process is briefly looked at in this interview.

What was the inspiration behind your design?

Nikitha Jayakumar (Nikhitha): Masks always overshadow the real beauty of lips, but during these times wearing mask is of utmost importance, I decided to incorporate a geometric embroidered version of tinted lips on the mask with few contrasting cross motifs to better suit the wearers.

Aishwarya Babar (Aishwarya): Can people make their masks and gloves at home with used or waste fabrics? What are the problems people have been facing with masks and gloves? These problems and these questions helped me to think and design my mask as a solution to these problems.

Arundhati Abipsha (Arundhati): My mask design was inspired by the versatile culture worldwide. Our lips speak a variety of languages and we do numerous tasks with our hands. This is what inspired me to come up with this design, where they are so similar yet so different.

Anushree Agarwal (Anushree): My inspiration was Spiderman (I was binge-watching all movies) *cheeky grin*.

Finalist: Vasanti Choudhary

How long did it take for you to come up with this idea and make it into your design?

Vasanti Choudhary (Vasanti): To be honest, I always reuse my old Kurtis to make pillow covers, small blankets or doormats. So with the Covid-19 still affecting us, when I saw the contest, I thought that it was the best way to utilise them and make new sustainable masks and gloves. In total, it took 2 hours to conceptualise by hand first, and then digitally.

Akarshi Shrivastava (Akarshi): As I mentioned before, this idea struck me a while ago but I didn’t think that much about it. It was actually through this contest that I brainstormed. It took me a couple of hours to come up with this functional concept which could be DIY-ed at home easily.

Sushmita Mandal (Sushmita): It took me 2-3 days to decide on the motifs and patterns I wanted. Then I finalised on the design that doesn’t call for too much attention, but worth noticing.

Finalist: Nikhitha Jayakumar

Post Covid-19, how do you think your product will perform?

Nikitha: The usage of mask wouldn’t see its end quite soon post Covid-19, since such upcycled denim masks mass manufactured with modern technology, its increased usage would definitely find its place in the world of fashion and the world of pollution.

Akarshi: Post Covid-19, my mask would work well because since wearing masks is the new normal, my product is highly customizable so everybody could rock this face mask with any kind of outfit, with or without the shield.

Finalist: Aishwarya Babar

What age bracket is your design aimed towards?

Akarshi: I don’t have an age bracket as such because I want my product to reach every person especially the working-class population who can’t wear masks and face shields for a long duration while at work because they can be straining.

Sushmita: The design is subtle, has a hint of ethnicity, and chic. I believe it will suit all age groups.

Finalist: Akarshi Shrivastava

How would you work towards achieving mass production of your Design?

Aishwarya: For mass production, we can replace the umbrella fabric ( used in gloves ), with polyester which is made from waste plastic ( bottles, bags, etc.) The fabric can be recycled and coated with polyurethane to make it waterproof. Cotton fabric can be used to line the inner layer of gloves. Keeping in mind the soft feel and the functionality, the inner layer of the mask can be lined with cotton too. The mask’s outer layer can be made by sewing up patches, unused industrial waste fabrics to make the mask.

Chinmayi Sawant (Chinmayi): I would really love to have my design mass produced and start up a thrift store of masks where people can give their old shirts and clothes. These can be used to develop recycled and sanitised masks. The idea of such sustainable yet fashionable masks can reach a large audience.

Finalist: Arundhati Abipsha

How can your design bring about the change in the world today?

Nikitha: The main message is that sustainability doesn’t limit the doors to fashion. There is always a way to look stylish and up to trend without harming the earth.

Aishwarya: In today’s time, the change this world needs is saving the environment. The more the people and industries go towards sustainability, the better we will be, my design was to try and make things from waste materials and prolong its usage.

Sushmita: In today’s time, the change this world needs is saving the environment. The more the people and industries go towards sustainability, the better we will be, my design was to try and make things from waste materials and prolong its usage.

Finalist: Chinmayi Sawant

How do you want your client to feel when wearing your design?

Akarshi: The most important thing I want my wearer to feel is to feel safe because, during these dark times, where everyone is scared and anxious about their well-being. Secondly, I want them to feel fashionable again because my masks are customizable and one mask can give you 3 different looks (without shield, without cords & shields and cords both) so they could style them as they wish!

Finalist: Avni Singhal

How have you managed to incorporate your personal style into this particular design you have created?

Vasanti: Generally, I am the kind of person who doesn’t want to waste things, and also being a housewife, we don’t waste anything. If we can recycle everything from food to our old clothes, we can do anything. In India the ladies are so much creative with their foods and clothes, as I am, this is the reason I have prepared this kind of gloves, the Kurtis which was used by new mothers which won’t be used after that, this is my style to reuse the old Kurtis into the designer masks and gloves.

Nikitha: Bold, unusual and quirky is my style. People usually question the comfort and the ease of a denim mask. My bold design and techniques answer those questions. Everyone wants to look different, unique and up to date with the trends. I feel my designs are just the right amount of innovative and different.

Arundhati: I’m a very versatile person. I prefer casual and comfort over power dressing but with small yet fashionable touches. My design is a mere reflection of my style. It consists of something as simple as a cotton base and a power design that spices up the entire design.

Sushmita: I have always wanted to make designs that convey a message. This design is exactly how I wanted it to be. It has a lot of meaning and history associated with it.

Anushree: I personally only lean towards the kind of fashion that brings me comfort, make me feel confident, and something that is relatable to me. So my designs aim to bring about a combinations of all of my likes.

Finalist: Sushmita Mandal

What were the limitations that you faced while coming up with this design?

Vasanti: So many! The clothes’ textures, colors, feel, their sustainability quotient, maintaining the continuity of the designs… These are the design’s demands. Also, since they are so colorful, senior citizens may not prefer it. Moreover, matching the patches was a big task.

Akarshi: The only limitation I faced was to find an eco-friendly alternative for the shield part because those are made from plastic. I brainstormed a lot to find a replacement for the plastic sheet that was affordable as well as recyclable, and I found that OHP (Overhead Projector) sheets were cheap, easily available and can be reused.

Sushmita: I didn’t want the design to take away the attention from the user as I wanted it to complement their personality. So it was difficult to choose the right color palette and motifs.

Finalist: Dona Ajay

Why should we care about sustainability according to you?

Aishwarya: For many years environmentalists have told us repeatedly why sustainability is important for us and our future generations. Now we have reached a point where sustainability is needed in all aspects of our lives.
The fashion industry is one of the biggest pollutants in the world, so I think young designers like me should try to incorporate sustainability in our design processes.

Sushmita: For many years environmentalists have told us repeatedly why sustainability is important for us and our future generations. Now we have reached a point where sustainability is needed in all aspects of our lives.
The fashion industry is one of the biggest pollutants in the world, so I think young designers like me should try to incorporate sustainability in our design processes.

Finalist: Anushree Agarwal

Author:
Dona Ajay
Finalist of “Coronial Innovate” Design Contest

3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Sthuthya Shaminder
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

#RiseAgain

Happy World Fashion Day 2020

School of Fashion Design & Technology ay Amity University Mumbai celebrated the fashion and design industry on the World Fashion Day on the designated day; 21st August 2020.

Though this year the pandemic has altered the complexion of buying, selling, production and supply of fashion products, yet, we are privileged to be a part of an industry that rises to all occasions and situations. So aptly enough, the theme chosen by the School for this year World fashion day was #RiseAgain.

The last two times there was a shift in fashion and the way we shopped was after the first and then second world war. The current pandemic will be the third largest influence on fashion.

Some of the predictable changes that will emerge are:

  • New Shopping patterns will emerge. More brands will go on-line, e-commerce wave and live-streaming will merge making on-line shopping interactive, experiential and in real-time. At Milan Fashion week, Armani also chose to live stream his new collection
  • AI & Tech will make stores go smart and computers and Apps will replace shop-floor in-store assistants.
  • Local will rule, since imports have been hit. Local designers, brands and even tailors will be endorsed. A much-needed boost to homespun, small, medium, new and large Indian brands will happen. Indian fabrics will be sought after.
  • Luxury brands are bound to slow down on their new launches. With decrease in prices hi-street brands may become more affordable to the masses.
  • People will go back to wearing fuss-free, germ-free and durable clothes. Recycling will be fashionable. So, for new looks, mix, match and re-use will be the mantra.
  • Healthcare will beat cosmetics and wellness will be the new buzzword.

With that said, and understood we still stand by the belief that the revival of the fashion industry to its full glory will come soon. The fashion & design industry is known to be the most dynamic and agile industry, that comes together as one conglomerate to beat all crisis.

Chanel has contributed its services by moving to production of production of masks and PPE gowns. Armani is making surgical overalls. Prada is making facial covers and…… H&M is making PPE for hospitals in Europe.

India too has created a new industry worth almost 10,000 crores in the last few months. Its making approx. 4.5 lakh PPE kits/day and has become the II largest manufacturer of PPE kits.

On that happy note, I wish you all a very happy, aesthetic and happening World Fashion Day 2020.

A lot of your fashion is at home, in your wardrobes, on-line and perhaps old storages.
So, stay home, stay safe, put together aesthetically existing items (clothes & accessories) and create new looks!!!

Prof (Dr) Bhawana Chanana with Team ASFDT, Mumbai.


Editors:
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Master of Design Programme

The Amity School of Fashion Design and Technology (ASFDT) gives us the opportunity to excel in all fields related to Fashion, from research and development to designing the fabric to putting it together into a garment, and this is very evident in the M. Design (Fashion Technology) programme.

Talking about my experience with the institution, as a student of the masters programme, it has been nothing short of exceptional. The labs and classrooms are fully equipped with all the materials required. All the hard-work our faculties are putting can be seen with the performance level of my fellow students of our department. Their skills are well polished and nurtured to its level best. Each and every one of us is individually taken care of, and the faculties always ensure to be flexible and understanding enough to make us feel comfortable enough to share anything and everything with them.

Staying at Amity’s hostel also feels like a home away from home, with really fun and entertaining hostel friends that make my life here nothing short of enjoyable. The education and the exposure that they give us, brews the needed confidence in us and evolves us to become someone who is competent enough to face the complications and competitions in the Industry.

The masters programme creates avenues for professionals like me who are pursuing a higher education in the area of fashion design. It is designed in a way that it chooses to focus towards academic concepts and industry related Research & Development.

Personally, I hold a Bachelors degree in fashion design and have studied about fashion and textiles industry, which helped me to generate a lot of ideas and skillsets in creative ways to combine research and practice. The research environment at ASFDT equips us to provide critical solutions to current as well as future problems, and innovations for the evolving fashion industry.

Apart from research we also get a lot of exposure to the different sectors of the Fashion Industry like Textiles, Graphics, Styling, Costumes Designing, Brand Designing and many more. Adding on to this list of continuous learning, we also learn about Media in Fashion Studies and Entrepreneurship, which are key to starting new ventures and innovating. Hence, I genuinely think that the Master’s programme in Design at Amity is designed to cater to the burgeoning requirements of industry in the forthcoming years, preparing me to better prepared for the industry, and I couldn’t be more thrilled about my career post ASFDT’s masters programme experience.


Author:
Avni Singhal
2nd Year, M. Des

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Shezeen Gola
Faculty, ASFDT

Amity Students : Re-describing Textile & Household Fabric Waste Sustainably.

चिंदी written in Devanagari script stands for small bits of fabric, encountered either as textile waste or more commonly residue of fabrics from household use. That was exactly the inspiration for the designer to make the most out of a huge number of waste fabric pieces that go to the dumpster. Chindi means a labour of love. Combining the passion for knitting, braiding, crocheting and recycling together for fashion was the designer’s main aim. The art of Chindi was born to promote rural handicrafts and not simply something our grandmothers once did.

Sejal Thakur showcasing her collection Punarkala


I presented the collection at Bombay times fashion week name Punarkala the labour of love on 13th of March 2020. I walked the ramp as my name was called out “ Sejal Thakurr” designer but the collection was devoted to all the women sitting in rural Maharashtra, who helped me from stage one. The point was not exclusively to create just any other collection that would have looked pretty or beautiful on the ramp, however it was to help ladies in rural Maharashtra by generating a source of income for them.

Designer – Sejal Thakur

The collection was a resort wear collection with Chindi fabric that was created from scratch as well as bright hand spun Khadi fabric. It communicated something specific that you can look in vogue and still have fun with your garments while being fashionably responsible. The collection of two skirts, top coordinates, one dress, one pant and top along with the showstopper cape all have just one thrust – the unification of tradition and modernity.


Authors:
Sejal Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Muskan Syed
1st Year, Fashion Design

Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Abhirami Vishnu
2nd Year, Textile Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photo credits:
Sejal Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Special thanks to:
Sushrut Koche
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Amity Students : Reframing Jamdani

A walk down the memory lane is always a refreshing and an enriching experience. The collection Nishabdh by Amit Shil set forth an extravagant form of aesthetic fondness. Jamdani is a special woven fabric in cotton. The weave done by loom on brocade is a time-consuming process and is a blend of figures and floral motifs. It’s origin is from one of ancient textile weaving centers in Dhaka, Bangladesh.


The designer showed personal interest in the construction of the fabric and thus, visited the spot where Jamdani is manufactured in Kolkata, West Bengal. He had the luxury of getting the basic weaving knowledge about the fabric in a more technical aspect, thus enhancing his interest in designing garments using the Jamdani fabric.

The colour white was chosen as a sign of elegance, sophistication and luxury along with a sense of power and confidence. The colour brings out the beautiful weave of the fabric as well as the classy silhouettes bringing forth a priceless look over all

According to me, ‘inspiration is something that comes from the within and from the moments we have lived,’ and I have spent most of my childhood seeing my mother wear Jamdani sarees and tell me about how elegant yet comfortable they were. My collection Nishabdh is a contemporary variant of the time-old classics. The blazers are classic silhouettes and so is the fabric of Jamdani. This combination speaks for itself as a face of ‘Powerful Elegance’.

Designer Amit Shil


The Oversized yet structural silhouettes and overemphasized sleeves pushed boundaries of accepted style by giving a powerful yet elegant appearance. The collection is presented with a combination of an oversized blazer with edgy cuts and with a very delicate fabric such as Jamdani. He intends to show everyone about how elegance is not just an abstraction.


Authors:
Sthuthya Shaminder
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Snehal Gaikar
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Andrew Joseph
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Technology
Sushrut Koche
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.


Amity Students: Combining Heritage Indian Arts with Challenging Textures for Fashion Week

Fashion has always been a repetition of ideas, but what makes it new is the way you put it together.

– Carolina Herrera.

Keeping this quote in mind, student of Amity School of Fashion Designing and Technology Mumbai, Miss Aksshaya Venkat showcased her debut collection titled Chitra Varnan on the platform of Bombay Times Fashion Week Spring-Summer 2020.

Her collection spoke about traditional Indian arts, painstakingly woven and painted in order to promote Slow Fashion. The theme of the collection was Greek-o-Bohemian, which had hand painted Kalamkari inspired from the famous motif of the ‘tree of life,’ and the beauty of nature with elements of flora and fauna with vivid traditional colours. The collection had elements of leather which was laser cut and intricately woven into a handmade fabric. Mixing masculine fabrics such as leather with soft feminine fabrics like silk made it even more creative and special to the designer. The accessories were made with feathers, beads and leather braids which complimented perfectly with the entire Greek-o-Bohemian appeal.

Chitra Varnan is one of my dearest works. Mixing leather weaving and hand painted silk Kalamkari was challenging but the outcome was wholesome and beautiful. The ‘tree of life’ motif used in the garments, is very symbolic to my journey from being a student to entering the fashion industry. It’s been my dream to bring in more unique combinations of rich heritage Indian arts and crafts into my future collections because they are to be treasured and preserved for the future generations.

Designer Aksshaya Venkat

The designer-student Aksshaya, with perseverance, determination and the help of faculty members and students of ASFDT, successfully showcased her debut collection at BTFW 2020.


Authors:
Deeplaxmi Naik
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Dona Ajay
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Sonal Dalvi
2nd Year, Textile Design

Photographers:
Andrew Joseph
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Design
Sushrut Koche,
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.


Amity Students: Combining The Artistry of Chikankari & Ajrakh for Fashion Week.

The collection named ‘Kashish’ which means ‘Attraction’ in Urdu was presented at The Bombay Times Fashion Week by Divya Karan and Ankita Aggarwal, 3rd year Fashion Design students of ASFDT.

The designers used fabrics that displayed femininity as well as boldness of the wearer.  Kashish brought out the inner beauty of the wearer, making her feel empowered, supreme yet graceful.

The use of delicately hand embroidered Chikankari on georgette by a group of five rural women as a legacy of Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh was coupled with hand printed, Indigo and Madder dyed Ajrakh, an art from the state of Gujarat.

This extraordinary combination of Ajrakh and Chikankari transforms our love for Traditional Indian Textiles in high street fashion with contemporary silhouettes. Through this collection we have tried to bring out the fact that high street fashion can also be worn without losing our traditionality and the customs. Kashish makes the wearer feel attached to their states and spreads social connectivity among the states.

– Designers Divya Karan & Ankita Aggarwal

Both, the fabrics and the designs, brought out the theme of ‘traditional Indian textiles with a contemporary silhouette’ creatively, yet gracefully.


Authors:
Divya Karan 
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Ankita Aggarwal
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Andrew Jospeh
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Design
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology Shines at Bombay Times Fashion Week 2020

Bombay Times Fashion Week ( BTFW ) is one of the country’s most coveted and star-studded fashion weeks. Designers have their hearts to showcase their collections in BTFW. It was a glorious moment for the students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai, to display their innovations in BTFW 2020 and get a delightful exposure.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology has always believed in doing fashion with a soul. The collection titled ‘Pratha’, stemmed from the fashion school’s initiative of reviving India’s cultural ethos and bringing it on the forefront of fashion. The collection was about India and how the people of the nation are still striving to keep their roots alive when it comes to traditions. Innovative designs and chic outfits were showcased by the students in four different sets.

Team ASFDT

The first collection by Aksshaya Venkat, titled ‘Chitra Varnan’, Greek-o-Bohemian, was about hand painted Kalamkari of the South inspired from the tree of life. The garments were in connection with demure leather weaving, silk and laser cutting and Greco-Bohemian statement.

Designer – Aksshaya Venkat

‘Kashish’, a collection filled with embroidered Chikankari of the North and printed Ajrak of the West, by Ankita Agarwal and Divya Karan, brought a strong attraction of visually striking colours and lightly sewn threads. They showcased modern cuts in high street ensembles with the combination of two stalwart traditional handicrafts. Mint green, maroon and indigo colours seized the attention of the spectators.

A playful and colourful atmosphere was created by Sejal Thakur with her collection, ‘Punar-Kala,’ a structured elite resort wear unleashing the sustainable handicraft of recycled textiles called Chindi. The collection was dedicated to the native artisans of Maharashtra. The leftovers fabrics were cut into strips, skilfully braided, knotted, crocheted, shaped and finally stitched together to form garments for the collection.

‘Nishabd,’ an incredible collection by Amit Shil, depicted simplicity and strength possessed by females using over-sized structural silhouettes with 3D pleated drapes. Oversized Avant-Garde androgynous ensembles in the finest fulwar jamdani with 3D Kirigami pleats in accordion pattern had a zen appeal and created a bold and emphatic style. The structured silhouettes, over-emphasized sleeves pushed boundaries of accepted style. Each model graced the ramp with elegance and power, thus making it a truly wonderful collection.

Designer – Amit Shil with his Jamdani Collection.

All the designers dedicated their precious time and effort in creating the collection, Pratha, and the support of numerous students and faculty members helped in making it a successful story for Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology.


Author:
Sthuthya Shaminder 
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Ruhi Kapoor
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Aditi Gupta
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai
.

Special Thanks:
Tanveer Khan Photography.

Catwalking Into Bombay Times Fashion Week

PicsArt_03-11-05.29.52

Amity University Mumbai’s School of Fashion Design & Technology (ASFDT) is one of India’s leading institutions in fashion firmament across the country. We are all about nurturing professionals in the fields of fashion, design, styling, and textiles in a fine blend of knowledge, technical skills and practical experience.

Currently the next big thing is showcasing designs by students that are not only well conceptualised and designed, but also with well-defined objectives. We believe and impart that we should design clothes with cause, especially emphasising strongly on conservation of and reviving traditional Indian arts & crafts. Our students are on their toes with the preparations to present collections that are not only are a treat to the eyes but also, a graceful delight to the soul and an agile joy to the spirit. Deep rooted to the delicate yet magnificent traditional Indian culture, Amity University Mumbai is all prepped to shine on the ramp. 

Bombay Times Fashion Week throughout the years has seen innovative drapes, some of the finest accessories and a host of celebrities. This year’s Bombay Times Fashion week is all set to raise the bar to the top in terms of fashion, creation, innovation and a luxurious extravaganza, and ASFDT is all set to grab the spotlight.

At 5:00 pm

Enjoy some of the behind-the-scenes images of students and faculties from our department at work and we hope to see you at Bombay Times Fashion Week, St. Regis at 5 pm!