Amity Students: Combining The Artistry of Chikankari & Ajrakh for Fashion Week.

The collection named ‘Kashish’ which means ‘Attraction’ in Urdu was presented at The Bombay Times Fashion Week by Divya Karan and Ankita Aggarwal, 3rd year Fashion Design students of ASFDT.

The designers used fabrics that displayed femininity as well as boldness of the wearer.  Kashish brought out the inner beauty of the wearer, making her feel empowered, supreme yet graceful.

The use of delicately hand embroidered Chikankari on georgette by a group of five rural women as a legacy of Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh was coupled with hand printed, Indigo and Madder dyed Ajrakh, an art from the state of Gujarat.

This extraordinary combination of Ajrakh and Chikankari transforms our love for Traditional Indian Textiles in high street fashion with contemporary silhouettes. Through this collection we have tried to bring out the fact that high street fashion can also be worn without losing our traditionality and the customs. Kashish makes the wearer feel attached to their states and spreads social connectivity among the states.

– Designers Divya Karan & Ankita Aggarwal

Both, the fabrics and the designs, brought out the theme of ‘traditional Indian textiles with a contemporary silhouette’ creatively, yet gracefully.


Authors:
Divya Karan 
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Ankita Aggarwal
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Andrew Jospeh
2nd Year, Masters in Fashion Design
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai.

Special thanks to:
Tanveer Khan Photography.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology Shines at Bombay Times Fashion Week 2020

Bombay Times Fashion Week ( BTFW ) is one of the country’s most coveted and star-studded fashion weeks. Designers have their hearts to showcase their collections in BTFW. It was a glorious moment for the students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology, Mumbai, to display their innovations in BTFW 2020 and get a delightful exposure.

Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology has always believed in doing fashion with a soul. The collection titled ‘Pratha’, stemmed from the fashion school’s initiative of reviving India’s cultural ethos and bringing it on the forefront of fashion. The collection was about India and how the people of the nation are still striving to keep their roots alive when it comes to traditions. Innovative designs and chic outfits were showcased by the students in four different sets.

Team ASFDT

The first collection by Aksshaya Venkat, titled ‘Chitra Varnan’, Greek-o-Bohemian, was about hand painted Kalamkari of the South inspired from the tree of life. The garments were in connection with demure leather weaving, silk and laser cutting and Greco-Bohemian statement.

Designer – Aksshaya Venkat

‘Kashish’, a collection filled with embroidered Chikankari of the North and printed Ajrak of the West, by Ankita Agarwal and Divya Karan, brought a strong attraction of visually striking colours and lightly sewn threads. They showcased modern cuts in high street ensembles with the combination of two stalwart traditional handicrafts. Mint green, maroon and indigo colours seized the attention of the spectators.

A playful and colourful atmosphere was created by Sejal Thakur with her collection, ‘Punar-Kala,’ a structured elite resort wear unleashing the sustainable handicraft of recycled textiles called Chindi. The collection was dedicated to the native artisans of Maharashtra. The leftovers fabrics were cut into strips, skilfully braided, knotted, crocheted, shaped and finally stitched together to form garments for the collection.

‘Nishabd,’ an incredible collection by Amit Shil, depicted simplicity and strength possessed by females using over-sized structural silhouettes with 3D pleated drapes. Oversized Avant-Garde androgynous ensembles in the finest fulwar jamdani with 3D Kirigami pleats in accordion pattern had a zen appeal and created a bold and emphatic style. The structured silhouettes, over-emphasized sleeves pushed boundaries of accepted style. Each model graced the ramp with elegance and power, thus making it a truly wonderful collection.

Designer – Amit Shil with his Jamdani Collection.

All the designers dedicated their precious time and effort in creating the collection, Pratha, and the support of numerous students and faculty members helped in making it a successful story for Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology.


Author:
Sthuthya Shaminder 
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Ruhi Kapoor
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Aditi Gupta
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers:
Photography Team,
Amity University Mumbai
.

Special Thanks:
Tanveer Khan Photography.

Catwalking Into Bombay Times Fashion Week

PicsArt_03-11-05.29.52

Amity University Mumbai’s School of Fashion Design & Technology (ASFDT) is one of India’s leading institutions in fashion firmament across the country. We are all about nurturing professionals in the fields of fashion, design, styling, and textiles in a fine blend of knowledge, technical skills and practical experience.

Currently the next big thing is showcasing designs by students that are not only well conceptualised and designed, but also with well-defined objectives. We believe and impart that we should design clothes with cause, especially emphasising strongly on conservation of and reviving traditional Indian arts & crafts. Our students are on their toes with the preparations to present collections that are not only are a treat to the eyes but also, a graceful delight to the soul and an agile joy to the spirit. Deep rooted to the delicate yet magnificent traditional Indian culture, Amity University Mumbai is all prepped to shine on the ramp. 

Bombay Times Fashion Week throughout the years has seen innovative drapes, some of the finest accessories and a host of celebrities. This year’s Bombay Times Fashion week is all set to raise the bar to the top in terms of fashion, creation, innovation and a luxurious extravaganza, and ASFDT is all set to grab the spotlight.

At 5:00 pm

Enjoy some of the behind-the-scenes images of students and faculties from our department at work and we hope to see you at Bombay Times Fashion Week, St. Regis at 5 pm!

 

Heritage Handicrafts Workshop Day 2- Rabari Embroidery

Gujarat! The name itself gives us a crystal-clear picture of a world full of colours, designs, embroideries and mirror work. People all over the world have always been lured and fascinated by their unique and enchanting use of fabrics n embroidery techniques. One of the most famous embroidery is the Rabari embroidery of Kutch. It majorly works with chain stitches and extraordinary mirror works. Thanks to the department of Fashion Design and Technology at Amity Mumbai for organising traditional Indian textile embroidery workshop and exposing the students towards India’s exquisite artworks.

Sample of Rabari Embroidery

The workshop was directed by Ms. Raniben Rabari, who explained to us about the origin and techniques. Rabari Emboidery gets its name from the Rabari community, who are a nomadic / semi-nomadic community of western region of India, from Rajasthan to the Kutch region in Gujarat, the wandering gypsies. Rabari, or “Rahabari”means one who lives outside or “goes out of the path”. By the end of the twentieth century, Rabari embroidery started to get recognised by its use of mirrors (shisha) surrounded by colourful embroidery. Rabari mythology and their desert habitation have been an inspiration for many of the large and bold designs. They  work on a dark ground, with the individual motifs being outlined with chain stitch and then filled in with buttonhole stitch and herringbone stitch, all in brightly coloured threads. In addition, back stitch (bakhiya) is used to decorate the seams of women’s blouses and on men’s jackets (kediyun).

The students were given samples of base design on black casement fabric and were taught different types of chain stiches on that design along with beautiful mirror works. They were also taught how to make a frame for the mirror to be in place on the fabric and then stitch. The students were provided with different shapes of mirrors and four colors of anchor threads to work with and were even briefed about feather stitch.The intricacy in the art work needs a whole lot of patience, focus, a creative and an active mind. It’s not just playing around with needle and thread. 

The workshop left everybody with a thought and inquisitiveness to learn about our traditional Indian artworks before jumping to the modern world. It also nourished the students about how a modified version of these artworks can be put into today’s contemporary designs.


Author:
Arundhati Abipsha
2nd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Sonal Dalvi
2nd Year, Fashion Design

Photographer:
Arundhati Abipsha
2nd Year, Fashion Design

Heritage Handicrafts Workshop Day 1- Pattachitra

Traditionally paper, textiles and stone have been used to create artworks. So, when a new base material is introduced the most intriguing aspect for me is ‘how did this come about?’

If I were one of the people living in a coastal area surrounded by swaying palm trees whispering constantly in the wind, would I ever be thinking of picking up the one fallen frond and using it as a drawing board?

Students Learning Etching on Palm Leaves

As a designer I look for creativity in any means, questions like these have always fascinated me. Fortunately, ASFDT has always been looking for ways of expanding our creativity skills by giving us modern designing techniques while keeping us in touch with our traditional arts. This time a workshop was organised for us to understand Pattachitra or Palm Leaf Etching.

It was directed by Mr. Narayan Das who himself was from Odisha. The place where Pattachitra originated. He explained the history behind the art and since the beginning of time, before paper was invented, people used to write and draw on palm leaves with stylus made of twigs sharpened with rocks to give the effect of a fine tip pen. Interestingly, all the Hindu books, like The Ramayana and the Mahabharata, The Vedas and The Upanishads and other mythological stories were all written on palm leaves.

Original Pattachitra Works

It is basically done on palm leaves but that is not all. The process of preparing the leaf as a canvas is itself an art. To prepare the palm leaf, the unripe leaves of the palm tree are first cut and semidried. It is then buried in swamps for 4-5 days for seasoning and then dried in shade. These are then stitched or stringed together as per the need. At times they are stitched after the etching is complete. The leaf is then hung for a whole of 2 years before it is used. The colour of the leaf never fades after the process and it never gets contaminated.

Well, the motive of this process is preserving the art for thousands of years. Luckily, we got pieces of the pre processed leaves by the artist itself. Samples of Pattachitra were also distributed for reference. The detailed work done on the leaf did blow my mind. As we aren’t professional Pattachitra artists we were asked to do the designs initially with pencil and then etch it with the special needle or a stylus provided by them.

ASFDT Students’ Works

We were given different designs for borders and the main motif for reference but were allowed to use our imaginations. Etching was a bit of a task but we were assisted with great patience by the artist. Needle used in the process for etching is of the same size of a normal pen or a pencil but heavier and with ends sharp enough to etch the processed leaf. After etching, kohl or ‘kajal’ paste is applied on the etched design to colour it black.

Students applying wet kohl to their works to process the etching

The art seems like it is a piece of cake but it takes a lot of effort and intricate work experience and perfection. For me the workshop really made me understand that creativity has no limit and the amount of focus and patience required for making a simple palm leaf etching. The traditional Indian culture has always amazed me. The more I get to know about it the more curious and fascinating it gets.


Author:
Sonali Ojha
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Dona Ajay
2nd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

Graphic Designer:
Sonal Dalvi
2nd Year, Fashion Design

Photographers :
Arshi Chaudhary
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Remya Shais
3rd Year, Fashion Design

Maharishi: A Brand With Style and Substance

“Environmental concern will continue to grow and will be a norm for the future generation, who may look back on old and current practices with disdain or horror.”

“Environmental concern will continue to grow and will be a norm for the future generation, who may look back on old and current practices with disdain or horror.”

Said Hardy Blechman, the founder of the label MAHARISHI. The brand sounds quite Indian but it isn’t at all. MAHARISHI is a London based men’s street wear label, founded in 1994. The most exciting thing about this brand that made me write this article completely in favor of it was the cause for which it was started.

Hardy Blechman realized that there wasn’t any stylish clothing made with an environmental concern, so he decided to introduce his label MAHARISHI. It focused on production of high end fashion clothing from hemp and other natural fibers. Later, Hardy realized that it was becoming difficult to make a complete collection out of hemp; he made a creative decision of using military and industrial surplus for his collection.

Source: Wikipedia.com
Edited using PicsArt Application

Speaking of which, an interesting fact about the label, which caught my eye, is the heavy military influence. The use of camouflage pattern is quite expected but the label presents it in a much oblique manner. The brand has always taken cues for designs from around the globe and does it till date. Hardy’s combat pants known as ‘SNOWPANTS’ with a signature Chinese dragon on the back became an ‘ITEM’ for almost a decade. Apart from this, for their SS16 collection showcased at LCM, the brand gained major acknowledgement from the fashion fraternity worldwide. Many heads turned when a cross-breed of military influence with Buddhists monk’s robe and Judaic prayer string was put on the ramp with a very clear message of a unified earth. The super continent ‘PANGEA’ was used as a motif that depicted the unification of all countries as one. The colour palette included Roman Catholic purple and golden brown with Thai Buddhist Monk’s bright orange working together in harmony both spiritually and aesthetically. All the garments made were environmentally and economically efficient i.e. produced with fair trade front of mind.

Source: facebook.com
Edited using PicsArt Application

The brand still continues to stand by its principles of green and sustainable fashion. The brand proved it with their latest collaboration with Nike. The NIKE Air Max 90 ‘MAHA OLIVE’ was made of 100% organic cotton and natural sources like turmeric and pomegranate are used as dyeing material.

Thus brands like MAHARISHI that encourage environmentally and culturally sustainable fashion must be promoted. This article may not be a ‘REVIEW’ but it is a mere shout out to this unique brand.


Author:
Daksh Vohra
2nd Year, Textile Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

Graphic Designers:
Abhirami Nair
2nd Year, Textile Design
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd Year, Fashion Design

What We Do When It’s Design Week

We look for design inspirations and meet design gurus like Sabyasachi Mukherjee, of course!

All about Luxury Art & Decor, it was indeed a great fortune for the students of Amity School of Fashion & Design Technology to attend the AD Design Show on the 18th of October 2019. A design fair of international standards, both Indian and International Brands showcased their furniture and art as a visually meal for attendees and exhibitors alike, creating new standards in aesthetic display in India.

Let’s see some of the iconic displays together, and while we are at it, enjoy some of the doodles we created on the pictures!

The students saw the thriving pottery of Kutch that dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization.Vessels like badham for drinking water, maati for churning buttermilk, patar for kneading dough were being made and hand-painted artistically, after which the vessel was covered in a colourful knitted rope. There were kaarigars (Hindi, for craftsmen) from the design studio in Talianna making intricate embroidery done live by Nasiruddin Mollha and Khurshid Alam. The traditional craftsmanship made was a love at first sight and piqued the viewers’ interest in Indian Textiles as they were achieved by using only a needle and thread, all thanks to the designer Peter d’ascoli. We also got to see Gyaser, a Tibetan word for exquisite silk brocade fabrics, that were handwoven on pit looms using zari made of 98.5 % silver and plated with 24 carat gold. This was demonstrated by Chottey Lal and Pakhendu Baheliya. Heirloom Naga is a textile studio in which Chilo Koza and Zuthiu work. They take inspiration from Chakhesang tribe of Nagaland and weave patterns that are classic and show diversity of textile designs in Naga society.

In Alborg’s booth, there were beautifully sculpted miniature statues which were contemporary with  unique style and decor. In Apparao Galleries, the artists were able to intrigue and depict a thought provoking message through the art. The showcase of hands on the wall showed the concept of Shunya that symbolized the real balance between diverging tendencies. At the ceiling was a rotating moon sculpture that fascinated everyone with its sheer brilliance. In Phillips Antique’s booth the students got to see a mix of ancient religion symbolic sculptures that were colourful, bold and filled with precious treasures of timeline. The Woodfeather brand by Akshay Sharma was handcrafted with care showcasing stylish wooden propellers having a quirky and amusing side to it. Arnaya showcased interesting pieces of furniture and an exclusive interior designs in collaboration with Gauri Khan. The vibrant, colourful artistic rugs of Jaipur depicted rich heritage of Jaipur in balance with contemporary art. The cleverly made artwork in Nature Morte’s Booth talked about Nature sliding down through the cracks symbolizing how the thinking of the modern world would not save us from nature itself causing nature to flow in a downward direction. The brand Carpet Cellar had abstract, playful and fascinating carpets displayed in a creative and amusing manner. 

Students of Amity School of Fashion & Design Technology With Sabyasachi Mukherjee

The most memorable event of this day for the students was getting  the opportunity to meet and interact with the talented Designer Sabyasachi who welcomed them wholeheartedly. The whole event was enlightening and showed them different forms of art expressed in a meaningful, colourful and alluring manner.


Header Image Credits:
@vectorpouch on Freepik.com

Written by:
Dimple Sampat
4th Year, Fashion Design

Graphic Designer:
Bhavya Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editors:
Pearl Sebastian
4th Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Faculty, Fashion Design

Stalls, Flash Mobs, Ramp-walks Amidst Horror

The Best of Halloween Celebrations At Amity Mumbai This Year

31st October is celebrated as Halloween all over the world and as this culture spreads between the masses, people are getting creative by the day, with parents putting in the most effort to get creative with their kids outfits to young adults experimenting with their outfits and makeup to look the spookiest and trendiest of all the ghosts and witches. It’s really intriguing how this “trend” has caught up and transformed into a tradition worldwide.

The tradition originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain that’s pronounced “Sow-in”, where people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts in the 16th-century Ireland, Scotland, England and other British and Irish islands formerly known as the Celtic nations. This day marked the end of summer and harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. 

Source: Flickr.com @infomatique

The Celts celebrated their New Year on November 1st and believed that on the night before the New Year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. So, on the night of October 31st they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

After the Roman Empire had conquered the majority of the Celtic territory, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional celebration of Samhain the first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honour Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. 

Source: Flickr.com @joshua_santino

As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups and the American Indians merged, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included “play parties,” which were public events held to celebrate the harvest. Neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other’s fortunes, dance and sing. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. These parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes. In the second half of the 19th century, the Irish immigrants in America helped to popularize the celebration of Halloween nationally. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the 20th century.

In India, Halloween tends to fall between our traditional festivals of Durga puja and Dussehra and coincides with Diwali or Kali puja and thus sometimes creates a sort of perplexity in the minds of the “woke Indians” as to what should be celebrated and what shouldn’t.

The coming of the 21st century saw a lot of beliefs and stringent traditions and customs in India being questioned and evolving by the day with each passing generation, and people have started to welcome the idea of celebrating other worldly festivals and occasions. Thus, Halloween too has started to get some due importance and is being celebrated in our own spooky sweet way.

Source: wikipedia.com

This October, the students of Amity School of Fashion and Technology were sure to plan the Halloween celebrations a week in advance in college with the support of our faculties. With an impeccable decor setup which literally gave people the Halloween chills, it was truly an “enter at your own risk,” bewitching experience where the character masquerade was held; students dressed in all kinds of ghastly characters to win the competition and impress the judges (and probably the only day you would see supernatural creatures competing against each other in a Fashion walk.) 

A flea market selling everything from handmade cards, paintings earrings and some delicious boulangerie items to other festive buys like hand painted Diyas, really helped promote the idea of “creating art” and “supporting artists” . We also had some crazy talented young artists doing body art and transforming them to the scariest versions of themselves. Minus the American way of trick-o-treating, everyone present had a great Halloween get-together filled with lots of fun, with an Indian touch!


References:
Halloween | Definition, History, & Facts. (2019). Retrieved 14 November 2019, from https://www.britannica.com/topic/HalloweenHalloween: Origins,Meaning&Traditions- History. (2019). Retrieved 14 November 2019, from https://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween

Author & Graphic Design:
Pearl Sebastian
4th Year, Fashion Design

Editor:
Shalini Mohanty
Faculty, Fashion Design

Here Is How Every Brand Is Making Money Out Of NASA

Fashion influences and is influenced by almost everything on this planet, and sometimes even beyond this planet – the space.

When we talk about space, one of the first things that comes to our mind is the biggest space research centre in the world, National Aeronautics and Space Research Administration (NASA).

Not only is it known for conquering and accumulating data from the outside the realms of this planet but recently, it has been conquering the fashion industry as well. From rockets to jackets, the NASA logo is everywhere – the ‘NASA’ one written over a blue globe and also the acronym with an undulating typography. From Heron Preston’s techpants to Vans ‘Space Voyager’, from H&M to Puma or Nike, its logos seems to be omnipresent.

Source: pexels.com by Jonas Svidras

The reason why NASA attracts so many designers and brands is because of the internal ethics of the organization and the inspiration it serves to all. Stuart Vever, Coach’s creative director recently said that, “There’s something about the time of the space program that just gives the feeling of possibility”. It brings a nostalgic feeling. From the man’s first step on moon to setting up the International Space Station, NASA has played an important role in the greatest achievements of mankind. This ‘adds’ to the authenticity of a design. This is what makes a garment so special with just a simple logo on it.

Nasa, Usa, Kennedy Space Center
Source: Maxpixel.com

Quoting one of the communication officers, “The company does not make any discrimination with respect to which company can use its logo and which cannot. Everyone from Walmart to H&M to Heron Preston to Vans and so on can make a request to use the logo”. However, the officers at NASA work with designers to ensure that their organisation’s identity is being used correctly.

And this is how everyone is making money using NASA’s logo except NASA itself. NASA is a government logo and the company makes no money when its logo is used. But what makes you buy some techpants for $1000 with just a logo on it? Food for thought, while you enjoy these stunning NASA collaborations with key brands in the last few years.

From the landing of Apollo 11 to the launch of Artemis, as the technology will advance further and NASA completes more of its missions and evolves in its success, the space program trend will be here to stay, in and out of the fashion industry.


References:
Almost Anyone Can Use NASA’s Name and Logos, Just Don’t Call it a Collaboration — The Fashion Law. (2019). Retrieved 26 October 2019, from http://www.thefashionlaw.com/home/almost-anyone-can-use-nasas-name-and-logo-just-dont-call-it-a-collaboration

Author:
Daksh Vohra
2nd Year, Textile Design

Editors:
Rucha Verma
4th Year, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, Fashion Design

Graphic Designers:
Sejal Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design
Bhavya Thakur
4th Year, Fashion Design

Happy Hanbok Day!

Here we are on our first post, dishing out some unique features about the famous Korean Traditional Costume

When we look for any culture in the world, the first things we look for are the cuisines and the traditional attires. And since it’s National Hanbok Day in South Korea, we will take a closer look at their ethnic costume, although their food is elegant and scintillating in equal amounts!

Source: Rawpixel.com on Freepik

The hanbok has been turned into a global phenomenon, thanks to the Korean Drama industry and their many addictive Television Series that showcase their traditional costume often. To break it down for you understand, the woman’s hanbok consists of a blouse shirt called jeogori and a wrap-around a skirt called chima, which is made of a rectangular piece of fabric, pleated or gathered into a skirtband. There is also an underskirt or the petticoat called sokchima as an additional layer.

Source: commons.wikimedia.com

The man’s hanbok consists of jeogori too with loose-fitting pants called baji, which allows them to sit comfortably on the floor. Po or Pho is an outer robe or overcoat. Jokki is a type of vest while mogoja is an outer jacket, which is worn over the jeogori for warmth and style. The silhouette of jeogori has changed over time for women as the modern version is longer than its original counterpart yet somehow, still above the waistline.

From Korean Drama: Love In The Moonlight
Source: facebook.com

Throughout the Korean history, people saw their attires socially divided: a type for the commoners and another for the nobility, so that the two classes would stand apart in public. The upper classes wore a range of colours, thanks to the variety of natural dyes extracted from flower petals. However, the commoners were required to wear white, but could also dress in shades of pale pink, light green, grey or charcoal on special occasions. The Korean social status could also be identified by the material used in the making of the hanbok. The upper classes had their hanbok made of various high grade lightweight materials in warmer months, and of silks throughout the remainder of the year. Commoners, on the other hand, were restricted to cotton only.

Photo by Pauline Mae De Leon on Unsplash

Symbolically the use of patterns and motifs embroidered on hanbok often represented the wishes of the wearer. Peonies on a wedding dress, symbolised a wish for honour and wealth. Lotus flowers showed a hope for nobility, and bats and pomegranates indicated the desire for children. Other motifs like dragons, phoenixes, cranes and tigers were only meant for royalty and high-ranking officials.

Celebrating Hanbok Day in Seoul
Source: commons.wikimedia.com

Fun Fact: Today, while it is known as Hanbok in South Korea, North Korea has adopted it as Chos Ain-ot instead.


References:
KBS GLOBAL. (2019). Retrieved 18 October 2019, from https://web.archive.org/web/20080317124313/http://english.kbs.co.kr/korea/culture/clothing/ink_clt.html

Author:
Awani Tariyal
1st year student, Fashion Foundation Program

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
3rd year student, Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor

Art Credits:
Bhavya Thakur
4th year student, Fashion Design