Are Your Fashion Choices Green Enough?

Fashion is strongly intertwined with the environment. From a conceptual standpoint, consumers adopt the latest trends according to the fashion ‘season’ which follows the natural seasons. Another link (between fashion and the environment) is a physical one: the very materials used to construct garments. Even if the garments are constructed using synthetic fibres, their usage and disposal ultimately affects the world we live in.

As an environmental concern, Fashion must be an eco-friendly concept. This industry contributes 10% of global carbon emissions annually (more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined) making it extremely polluting. The eco-friendlier our wardrobe, the better it is for the environment.

Sustainable Fashion involves production, distribution and use of garments that are environmentally friendly. Adopting this will certainly contribute positively to the quality of our surroundings. These practices avoid using materials that contain harmful chemicals and reduce water consumption as well as waste production.

LENZINGTM ECOVERO TM is a sustainable fibre brand for apparel. Their branded viscose fibres (viscose: a polymer similar to rayon) are made from sustainable wood and pulp. They also have efficient water utilisation rates. Water used to produce a 150 gram t-shirt is 12.5 litres lesser than generic viscose and 210 litres lesser than conventional cotton. Reduced carbon emission is a splendid bonus. This wonderful production has been awarded the EU Ecolabel: it has met high environmental standards. Another brilliant feature is that these fibres biodegrade in three months only.

Fashion can influence our personality. It can help define our character, mindset, habits and so on. Go through your wardrobe: what are all the garments you have? Are you working towards keeping your wardrobe as sustainable as you can? Are your fashion choices green enough?


Author:
Nithuna Suresh K
2nd Year, B.des, Fashion Design
Atash Coyaji
1st Year, B.des, Textile Product Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphics:
Pravara Kanekar
1st Year, B.es, Fashion Communication.

Rent The Runway

The online ‘Rental Fashion’ market in India has been on its peak with mushrooming startups and classic brands attracting the posh. The new age fashionistas believe in renting, rather than buying expensive designer wear. Turning up at a high profile luxury event in clothes that are rented and not owned isn’t a taboo anymore rather a new normal for the elites. A hectic social life coupled with the onslaught of social media has made repeating ones clothing or accessory almost unforgivable and even social harakiri. Circumstantially it makes little sense to invest thousands of rupees on clothes that will be worn once and be relegated to a corner in the closet.

A decade ago, renting high-end luxury or designer wear was more or less unheard of. Women who didn’t want to purchase an expensive dress for a one-time event were left to borrow it from a friend. Designer gown and accessory rentals were the exclusive territory of celebrities and their stylists.

While the international market is huge for wardrobe rental services, with successful ventures like rent the Runway, Lending Luxury, Girl Meets Dress, etc, for India this trend is still taking its baby steps. Shilpa Bhatia, an erstwhile Hindi film stylist, was among the first few to tap into the potential of luxury rental as early as in 2005 when she launched ‘The Clothing Rental’ in Mumbai. The Clothing Rental thrives today with two stores in Mumbai apart from an online presence. Offering similar deals are a number of online fashion rentals, including flyrobe.com, swishlist.in, stylebank.in, liberent.com and stage3.co.

Renting outfits has become common for those once-in-a-lifetime events (wedding, mehendi, sangeet, bridal showers, and bachelorette parties) that require a level of luxury that’s not necessarily worth the long-term investment. For instance, Flyrobe which claims to have partnered with designer labels like Outhouse, Masaba Gupta, Ritu Kumar, and Shehla Khan supplies western wear on-demand with a three-hour delivery timeline and the ethnic wear on advance booking. 

The concept of luxury rental is simple: Customers can choose from designer garments, handbags, sunglasses, jewellery and other accessories they like, rent it for a couple of days at a fraction of the retail price and then return it; so easy!. The courier is then picked up from your doorstep back to where it belongs. Some companies even allow the person to own it by paying the retail price for the item.

In today’s time, when everything is for everyone, the allure of ‘no ownership’ moves beyond housing and cars bringing High-End Fashion to its dawn as one of the biggest rental industries . It assures satisfaction to the customer’s desire for a luxury product without endangering their kidneys. The new generation raves multiple experiences and desires to be fashionable and trendy, without the pressure of a permanent commitment.


Author: Vasanti Choudhary 2nd Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Indrani Roy
1st Year, B.Des. Fashion Design

Midi-Skirts & Boots – Never Outta Style

Midi-skirt with boots- a combination anyone would love to wear. Flared midi-skirts when worn with ankle boots give out a whole ‘retro yet trendy‘ look. What sets apart the midi-skirts from all other skirts is the style and the length of it which ends right at the wildest part of your leg; the mid-calf, giving the illusion that your calf thicker than it really is. Similarly ankle boots cover the thinnest part of our legs that is the ankle. Some may say that styling Midi-skirts with ankle boots maybe risky but if done well and carried with confidence, it surely is a feast.

Sometimes it may be recommended to wear neutral/nude coloured boots that go with skin colour of the wearer and create an illusion of elongated legs rather than the regular dark coloured boots that give away a stumpy look. Unlike this, many stylists or fashion influencers over Instagram, YouTube or blogs style dark coloured boots with solid pastel or neon, flared midi-skirts or even with retro printed midi-skirts aiming for a grunge look.

Thus, depending on the wearer and how well they style and carry an outfit, midi-skirts and boots together are a combination that never go out of style.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Remembering Pierre Cardin

Pierre Cardin (02.07.22 – 29.12.20) was an Italian-born, naturalized-French fashion designer who was known for his Avant-garde and Space Age designs. 

He was a visionary designer who with his natural yet revolutionary designs, transformed the business of fashion. He clothed the elite but also reached the masses by affixing his name to an outpouring of merchandise ranging from off-the-rack apparel to bath towels. The French Fashion Designer passed away on 29th December 2020 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, just outside Paris at the age of 98.

Cardin went from the world of bespoke high fashion for private clients to ready-to-wear designs for the masses. From bubble dresses to aviator jumpsuits, fragrances to automobiles, ashtrays and even pickle jars, Pierre Cardin has his brand name inscribed on everything. Pierre Cardin planted his flag on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris, where he proceeded to turn the country’s fashion establishment on its head, reproducing fashions for mass, ready-to-wear consumption and taking on a blow to the elitism that had governed the Parisian couture. 

Cardin’s looks are based on geometry; it’s sculptural and sometimes kinetic. His designs also tend to the clean and minimal, and it’s been applied to dresses, furniture and even real estate. During his more than seven glorious decades spent in fashion industry, he brought geometric shapes to haute couture and made sure to carve the name of his brand on everything, from clothing to perfume to pens.

Pierre Cardin was one of the last men standing from the Golden Age of couture, having helped give birth to Christian Dior’s New Look, his technical ability is indisputable. Cardin was the only Paris couturier, outside of Balenciaga, who was not only a designer, but an excellent fitter and cutter.

Remembering the legendary fashion designer and his life happenings, his early works from 1950s to the 70s and his later works from the 70s to late 90s, the students of ASFDT were asked to make an inspiring and creative story on the 9th of January.

The students of Semester 1 & 4 with each group of 5 had to create an illustration per student, of his works.

The students of Semester 6 & M.Des with each group of 5 had to create a physical model and take pictures or videos of the making process. All works had to be created using available materials. 

Best works were displayed on ASFDT’s Instagram account as well as the StyleQ Digital Blog.


Author:
Dona Ajay
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Artworks by:
Students of Amity School of Fashion Design & Technology,
Amity University Mumbai

#FlashbackFriday: Resort 2021 Menswear

The past few months have illuminated significant lessons to the world of fashion in the interminable intensity of human potential, versatility and adaptability in the face of turmoil is an understatement. The pandemic had forced designers to reconsider craftsmanship, quality, and sustainability, with many delivering more streamlined collections. 

Despite a fashion calendar hanging in the balance and an evolving industry landscape with a future yet to be uncovered, the world’s leading designers unveiled their ‘Resort Menswear Collections’ with holiday vibes being more about a state of mind and not a tour around the globe, for all the obvious reasons. While each designer had their own perspective on how to capture the pandemic experience, they all aligned in one common thread: At the end of every tunnel is a light and it’s clear it will sparkle splendidly on the inimitable legacy of creativity and self-expression.

From quirky prints to minimal aesthetics, comfy lounge-worthy pieces and coordinated sets, Resort 2021 opened up a universe of alternatives for buyers. It would not be wrong to say that in the coming year, opposite styles are going to attract and the collections have a lot to offer. Fortunately for you, we’ve managed to distil some key statements that you should be looking for in the next year.

Starting with, Dior’s Oblique tapestry B23 high-tops; a trophy in the form of a turquoise lighter and new perforated leather accessories with reflective linings to catch the light may be more than we bargained for. Also, the insanely luxurious crocodile field jacket, is all about looking like one’s coming out of the apocalypse fighting. Dior’s must-haves are a camp shirt and matching shorts set needlepointed from seam-to-seam in the familiar Dior Oblique pattern. 

Virgil Abloh’s Resort 2021 collection for Louis Vuitton revealed that in streetwear era, a green leather jacket somewhere between sage and basil, a mink jacket with an oil slick sheen, loose-fitting pants, sneakers, and a pair of exuberant bucket hats can fit in anyone’s wardrobe and shake the next summer, with doing justice to the history and craftsmanship and savoir faire of Vuitton.

Tod’s Creative Director Walter Chiapponi approached the casual elegance of the ’70s for 2021. Shades of green, bordeaux, navy- and sky-blue will work in tandem with muted tones, and tastefully incorporated flashes of color into sportswear will meet the codes of sophistication. Pair of corduroy pants and upscale blazers would take classic constructions a step forward and give a twist of cool sophistication.

Salvatore Ferragamo’s unstructured, unlined suit cut from fresh sand-toned cotton and a touch of animalier, a hybrid giraffe-leopard pattern reworked from archival motifs printed on a generous, oversized men’s shirt will exude a lively, summery feel.

Modernized elements of highly geometric aesthetic when applied on chenille cardigans bring out a powerful and fresh template. Cheerful design components, for example, polka dots, peace symbols and smiley appearances —against light hues of pale pink, light yellow and sorbet orange by Moschino will help to put a smiley face to the look.

Perhaps the easiest to pull off of next season’s trends, with an emphasis on sharp tailoring and cutting the formality of the men’s tailoring with playful touches, like the little devils that crawl up trouser legs, Off-White merges a businessman with a youthful teenager and will be the drill next year.

With a ton of opposing trends, men have the opportunity to explore hard and soft, edgy and sweet, and see which look they gravitate towards more. One might end up consolidating different expressions for a personalized flair.


Author:
Ruhi Kapoor
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Illustrator:
Mansi Lohar
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

In Talks: With Bright Young Designers

With the Finalists of #Coronial_Innovate Design Contest 2020


“True sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.”

ASFDT along with Club Ami-Trendz conducted the ‘Coronial Innovate Design Contest’ on Innovation Day which is celebrated on 28th September 2020.

10 finalists were selected out of 65 entries from various schools of AUM, namely Avni Singhal (M.Des Sem 3), Nikhitha Jayakumar (Sem 7), Akarshi Shrivastava (Sem 7), Vasanti Choudhary (Sem 5), Arundhati Abipsha (Sem 5), Chinmayi Sawant (Sem 5), Dona Ajay (Sem 5), Aishwarya Babar (Sem 3), Sushmita Mandal (Sem 1) & Anushree (MT).

With ‘Versatile Geometry’ as the theme the contestants were asked to create a design for a mask and pair of gloves with their own creativity and innovation added to it. Their ideation and design thinking process is briefly looked at in this interview.

What was the inspiration behind your design?

Nikitha Jayakumar (Nikhitha): Masks always overshadow the real beauty of lips, but during these times wearing mask is of utmost importance, I decided to incorporate a geometric embroidered version of tinted lips on the mask with few contrasting cross motifs to better suit the wearers.

Aishwarya Babar (Aishwarya): Can people make their masks and gloves at home with used or waste fabrics? What are the problems people have been facing with masks and gloves? These problems and these questions helped me to think and design my mask as a solution to these problems.

Arundhati Abipsha (Arundhati): My mask design was inspired by the versatile culture worldwide. Our lips speak a variety of languages and we do numerous tasks with our hands. This is what inspired me to come up with this design, where they are so similar yet so different.

Anushree Agarwal (Anushree): My inspiration was Spiderman (I was binge-watching all movies) *cheeky grin*.

Finalist: Vasanti Choudhary

How long did it take for you to come up with this idea and make it into your design?

Vasanti Choudhary (Vasanti): To be honest, I always reuse my old Kurtis to make pillow covers, small blankets or doormats. So with the Covid-19 still affecting us, when I saw the contest, I thought that it was the best way to utilise them and make new sustainable masks and gloves. In total, it took 2 hours to conceptualise by hand first, and then digitally.

Akarshi Shrivastava (Akarshi): As I mentioned before, this idea struck me a while ago but I didn’t think that much about it. It was actually through this contest that I brainstormed. It took me a couple of hours to come up with this functional concept which could be DIY-ed at home easily.

Sushmita Mandal (Sushmita): It took me 2-3 days to decide on the motifs and patterns I wanted. Then I finalised on the design that doesn’t call for too much attention, but worth noticing.

Finalist: Nikhitha Jayakumar

Post Covid-19, how do you think your product will perform?

Nikitha: The usage of mask wouldn’t see its end quite soon post Covid-19, since such upcycled denim masks mass manufactured with modern technology, its increased usage would definitely find its place in the world of fashion and the world of pollution.

Akarshi: Post Covid-19, my mask would work well because since wearing masks is the new normal, my product is highly customizable so everybody could rock this face mask with any kind of outfit, with or without the shield.

Finalist: Aishwarya Babar

What age bracket is your design aimed towards?

Akarshi: I don’t have an age bracket as such because I want my product to reach every person especially the working-class population who can’t wear masks and face shields for a long duration while at work because they can be straining.

Sushmita: The design is subtle, has a hint of ethnicity, and chic. I believe it will suit all age groups.

Finalist: Akarshi Shrivastava

How would you work towards achieving mass production of your Design?

Aishwarya: For mass production, we can replace the umbrella fabric ( used in gloves ), with polyester which is made from waste plastic ( bottles, bags, etc.) The fabric can be recycled and coated with polyurethane to make it waterproof. Cotton fabric can be used to line the inner layer of gloves. Keeping in mind the soft feel and the functionality, the inner layer of the mask can be lined with cotton too. The mask’s outer layer can be made by sewing up patches, unused industrial waste fabrics to make the mask.

Chinmayi Sawant (Chinmayi): I would really love to have my design mass produced and start up a thrift store of masks where people can give their old shirts and clothes. These can be used to develop recycled and sanitised masks. The idea of such sustainable yet fashionable masks can reach a large audience.

Finalist: Arundhati Abipsha

How can your design bring about the change in the world today?

Nikitha: The main message is that sustainability doesn’t limit the doors to fashion. There is always a way to look stylish and up to trend without harming the earth.

Aishwarya: In today’s time, the change this world needs is saving the environment. The more the people and industries go towards sustainability, the better we will be, my design was to try and make things from waste materials and prolong its usage.

Sushmita: In today’s time, the change this world needs is saving the environment. The more the people and industries go towards sustainability, the better we will be, my design was to try and make things from waste materials and prolong its usage.

Finalist: Chinmayi Sawant

How do you want your client to feel when wearing your design?

Akarshi: The most important thing I want my wearer to feel is to feel safe because, during these dark times, where everyone is scared and anxious about their well-being. Secondly, I want them to feel fashionable again because my masks are customizable and one mask can give you 3 different looks (without shield, without cords & shields and cords both) so they could style them as they wish!

Finalist: Avni Singhal

How have you managed to incorporate your personal style into this particular design you have created?

Vasanti: Generally, I am the kind of person who doesn’t want to waste things, and also being a housewife, we don’t waste anything. If we can recycle everything from food to our old clothes, we can do anything. In India the ladies are so much creative with their foods and clothes, as I am, this is the reason I have prepared this kind of gloves, the Kurtis which was used by new mothers which won’t be used after that, this is my style to reuse the old Kurtis into the designer masks and gloves.

Nikitha: Bold, unusual and quirky is my style. People usually question the comfort and the ease of a denim mask. My bold design and techniques answer those questions. Everyone wants to look different, unique and up to date with the trends. I feel my designs are just the right amount of innovative and different.

Arundhati: I’m a very versatile person. I prefer casual and comfort over power dressing but with small yet fashionable touches. My design is a mere reflection of my style. It consists of something as simple as a cotton base and a power design that spices up the entire design.

Sushmita: I have always wanted to make designs that convey a message. This design is exactly how I wanted it to be. It has a lot of meaning and history associated with it.

Anushree: I personally only lean towards the kind of fashion that brings me comfort, make me feel confident, and something that is relatable to me. So my designs aim to bring about a combinations of all of my likes.

Finalist: Sushmita Mandal

What were the limitations that you faced while coming up with this design?

Vasanti: So many! The clothes’ textures, colors, feel, their sustainability quotient, maintaining the continuity of the designs… These are the design’s demands. Also, since they are so colorful, senior citizens may not prefer it. Moreover, matching the patches was a big task.

Akarshi: The only limitation I faced was to find an eco-friendly alternative for the shield part because those are made from plastic. I brainstormed a lot to find a replacement for the plastic sheet that was affordable as well as recyclable, and I found that OHP (Overhead Projector) sheets were cheap, easily available and can be reused.

Sushmita: I didn’t want the design to take away the attention from the user as I wanted it to complement their personality. So it was difficult to choose the right color palette and motifs.

Finalist: Dona Ajay

Why should we care about sustainability according to you?

Aishwarya: For many years environmentalists have told us repeatedly why sustainability is important for us and our future generations. Now we have reached a point where sustainability is needed in all aspects of our lives.
The fashion industry is one of the biggest pollutants in the world, so I think young designers like me should try to incorporate sustainability in our design processes.

Sushmita: For many years environmentalists have told us repeatedly why sustainability is important for us and our future generations. Now we have reached a point where sustainability is needed in all aspects of our lives.
The fashion industry is one of the biggest pollutants in the world, so I think young designers like me should try to incorporate sustainability in our design processes.

Finalist: Anushree Agarwal

Author:
Dona Ajay
Finalist of “Coronial Innovate” Design Contest

3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Sthuthya Shaminder
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

‘Le Oversized’

Where Comfort Meets Style…

In today’s world when everybody wants comfort before anything, oversized clothing is perceptibly making its way into everyone’s closets. Oversized clothes are considered as clothes that make you look trendy while giving you enough room to breathe and be in absolute comfort. If worn in the right way, they can look just as chic and smart as fitted, well-tailored clothes.

Image source – Pinterest.in

Many designers have showcased their collection with large shirts, tunics, t-shirts and hoodies etc. The main concept of loose clothing is to be comfortable yet fashionable.
The key to stand out when wearing an oversized garment is all about ‘how you wear it.’ It is important to wear it with the right selection of pants or accessories to go with it. For
girls, they tend to give a tomboyish look with a slight hint of femininity.

A lot of A-list celebrities, both Bollywood and Hollywood alike, like to wear loose t-shirts, oversized jackets and shirts when they make an appearance in public, that later gets slotted into street style looks, airport looks or just the regular grocery-run looks into various magazines, blogs and websites.

The combination of oversized t-shirts with cute white sneakers have consistently been in trend these past couple of years. After all, when has any perfect combination of fashion and comfort gone out of style? One can safely say, that this look will be worn by students and working professionals alike, because this classic doesn’t have an age bar.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Abhirami Vishnu
3rd Year, B. Des. Textile and Product Design

StyleQ Icons: 007

“The name is Bond, James Bond”. As exquisite is this dialogue, so has been the character’s fashion legacy. From Dr. No to Spectre, from Sean Connery to Daniel Craig, each actor that portrayed 007 has maintained that evergreen aura of the character’s styling. High octane action sequences in a tuxedo have proven the functionality as well as the sophistication of a garment alike. 

In the early 90s, the book ‘Dressed to Kill’ was dedicated to the styles and trends adopted by Bond. The character, James Bond is truly a master of men’s fashion. The best attires seen on this evergreen classic character can be-

  • Pierce Brosnan’s cream coloured Brioni Herringbone linen suit which he wore with a French Blue shirt in ‘The World Is Not Enough’.
Screenshot from the movie – The World is Not Enough
  • Black Dinner Suit with flared trousers and exaggerated point collars designed by Angelo Roma and worn by Roger Moore in ‘Moonraker’.
Screenshot from the movie – Moonraker
  • Double-breasted navy blazer worn by Roger Moore, designed by his own tailor, Douglas Hayward, which he wore with Gabardine trousers in the movie ‘For Your Eyes Only’.
Screenshot from the movie – For Your Eyes Only
  • Brunello Cucinelli brown favourite lighter Khaki trousers, worn by Daniel Craig in ‘Spectre’.
Screenshot from the movie – Spectre
  • The Midnight Blue Tuxedo with black shawl collars, stylized by Jany Temime, worn by Daniel Craig in ‘Skyfall’. This attire was originally inspired by Sean Connery’s ‘Dr. No’, the first Bond film. This attire broke the rules in the most subtle manner. The rule of ‘Bond wears classics’ was broken by creating another classic.
Screenshot from the movie – Skyfall
Screenshot from the movie – Dr.No

To maintain the legacy of this great character’s style sense, it took a lot from the actors portraying it and the designers styling it. Some great designers like Anthony Sinclair and Tom Ford have worked for the franchise series. And the baton has always been passed to the rightful retaining Bond as the most evergreen and stylish character in the past.

Bond has ruled our hearts and wardrobes for decades now. A Bond suit is in every guy’s wish list, but when added, it makes a man’s wardrobe.

Enjoy the new Trailer 2 of Bond Movie – No Time To Die


Author:
Daksh Vohra
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Dona Ajay
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Lavanya Murali
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

The Age Of Hippie Modernism

In the mid 1960s, a never-seen-before hippie counter-culture blossomed throughout the United States, which incited both the Flower Power Movement and the revulsion of more straight laced. Floral clothing and growing beards all became part of the evolving counter-culture in the hippie era. The casual glamour laced with tribal totems has served fashion past and present.

When the Spring/Summer 2019 of Chloé collection started to be walked down the runway, it was showed the perfect hippie-like flared trousers, pareo skirts and twisted silk lariat belt that would fit in at Coachella Valley Music and Art Festival. The collection is called Hippie Modernism because the designer wanted to bring it into the city with an urban flair. The tribal-inspired jewellery was also added to complete hippie look. 

The collection reflected the souvenirs of the counterculture with its avant-garde constructs of sensuality, femininity and utopian progress. Considering the lives and art forms of free-spirited women, the garments were graced by traditional textures and styling like scarf silks, ikat and bias-cut layering. The designs were basically the evolution of a new mentality following the original Hippie culture.


Author:
Artha Thakur
3rd Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

Editors:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Rutuja Konde
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design

#RiseAgain

Happy World Fashion Day 2020

School of Fashion Design & Technology ay Amity University Mumbai celebrated the fashion and design industry on the World Fashion Day on the designated day; 21st August 2020.

Though this year the pandemic has altered the complexion of buying, selling, production and supply of fashion products, yet, we are privileged to be a part of an industry that rises to all occasions and situations. So aptly enough, the theme chosen by the School for this year World fashion day was #RiseAgain.

The last two times there was a shift in fashion and the way we shopped was after the first and then second world war. The current pandemic will be the third largest influence on fashion.

Some of the predictable changes that will emerge are:

  • New Shopping patterns will emerge. More brands will go on-line, e-commerce wave and live-streaming will merge making on-line shopping interactive, experiential and in real-time. At Milan Fashion week, Armani also chose to live stream his new collection
  • AI & Tech will make stores go smart and computers and Apps will replace shop-floor in-store assistants.
  • Local will rule, since imports have been hit. Local designers, brands and even tailors will be endorsed. A much-needed boost to homespun, small, medium, new and large Indian brands will happen. Indian fabrics will be sought after.
  • Luxury brands are bound to slow down on their new launches. With decrease in prices hi-street brands may become more affordable to the masses.
  • People will go back to wearing fuss-free, germ-free and durable clothes. Recycling will be fashionable. So, for new looks, mix, match and re-use will be the mantra.
  • Healthcare will beat cosmetics and wellness will be the new buzzword.

With that said, and understood we still stand by the belief that the revival of the fashion industry to its full glory will come soon. The fashion & design industry is known to be the most dynamic and agile industry, that comes together as one conglomerate to beat all crisis.

Chanel has contributed its services by moving to production of production of masks and PPE gowns. Armani is making surgical overalls. Prada is making facial covers and…… H&M is making PPE for hospitals in Europe.

India too has created a new industry worth almost 10,000 crores in the last few months. Its making approx. 4.5 lakh PPE kits/day and has become the II largest manufacturer of PPE kits.

On that happy note, I wish you all a very happy, aesthetic and happening World Fashion Day 2020.

A lot of your fashion is at home, in your wardrobes, on-line and perhaps old storages.
So, stay home, stay safe, put together aesthetically existing items (clothes & accessories) and create new looks!!!

Prof (Dr) Bhawana Chanana with Team ASFDT, Mumbai.


Editors:
Shalini Mohanty
Assistant Professor, ASFDT

Graphic Designer:
Prarthana Kapadia
4th Year, B. Des. Fashion Design